Found 60 article(s) for author 'Carmen Reinhart'

The Crisis Next Time: What We Should Have Learned From 2008

The Crisis Next Time: What We Should Have Learned From 2008. Carmen Reinhart, November/December 2018, Paper, “At the turn of this century, most economists in the developed world believed that major economic disasters were a thing of the past, or at least relegated to volatile emerging markets. Financial systems in rich countries, the thinking went, were too sophisticated to simply collapse. Markets were capable of regulating themselves. Policymakers had tamed the business cycle. Recessions would remain short, shallow, and rare.Link

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Italy’s Long, Hot Summer

Italy’s Long, Hot Summer. Carmen Reinhart, May 31, 2018, Opinion, “Severe political uncertainty, chronic slow growth, and a sovereign-debt level currently hovering around 160% of GDP already is enough for Italy to trigger a debt crisis. And there is no plausible resolution that would not generate additional risks and complications.Link

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Monetary-Policy Normalization in Europe in 2018

Monetary-Policy Normalization in Europe in 2018. Carmen Reinhart, December 22, 2017, Opinion, “As the European Central Bank pursues monetary-policy normalization in 2018, it should proceed with caution. It will need to balance mounting pressure from Germany for faster normalization with a realistic assessment of the durability and breadth of the unfolding recovery.Link

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The Long and Winding Road to a Haircut

The Long and Winding Road to a Haircut. Carmen Reinhart, November 30, 2017, Opinion, “There are significant differences between Puerto Rico and Venezuela regarding the origins of their economic crises, their political systems, their relationship with the US and the rest of the world, and much else. Nonetheless, some notable similarities are likely to emerge as their debt sagas unfold.Link

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What lurks beneath the Euro

What lurks beneath the Euro. Carmen Reinhart, November 16, 2017, Opinion, “Earlier this year, the consensus among economists was that the United States would outstrip its advanced-economy rivals. The expected spurt in U.S. growth would be driven by the economic stimulus package described in President Donald Trump’s election campaign. But instead, the most notable positive economic news from the developed countries in 2017 has been coming from Europe.Link

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