Found 12 article(s) for author 'Business History'

Business, Ethics and Institutions: The Evolution of Turkish Capitalism in Global Perspectives

Business, Ethics and Institutions: The Evolution of Turkish Capitalism in Global Perspectives. , 2019, Book, “This book is the first systematic scholarly study on the business history of Turkey and its predecessor the Ottoman Empire from the nineteenth century until the present. It places the distinctive characteristics of capitalism in Turkey within a global and comparative perspective, addressing three related issues. First, it examines the institutional context that shaped capitalist development in Turkey. Second, it focuses on the corporate actors, entrepreneurs, and business enterprises that have led national economic growth. Third, it explores the ethical foundations and social responsibility of business enterprises in Turkey.Link

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The Unconventional Capitalism That Shapes Business History

The Unconventional Capitalism That Shapes Business History. Geoffrey Jones, May 15, 2019, Opinion, “In thinking about the current contested state of global capitalism, and what to do about it, much can be learned from the debates I heard at the recent Harvard Business School conference, Seeking the Unconventional in Forging Histories of Capitalism, which assembled a stellar and diverse cast of historians, management researchers, and others.  As co-organizer of the event with HBS Professor Tarun Khanna and Harvard-Newcomen Fellow Sudev J. Sheth, I was thrilled as participants explored, tested, and celebrated unconventional ideas, research topics and methodologies. Too often scholarly–and other–critiques of capitalism and big business resort to stereotypes and generalizations, sweeping the good, the bad, and the ugly into an amorphous single entity. Engaging seriously with the past can be liberating and provide a refreshing lens to think about the future.Link

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VC: An American History

VC: An American History. Tom Nicholas, 2019, Book, “A major exploration of venture financing, from its origins in the whaling industry to Silicon Valley, that shows how venture capital created an epicenter for the development of high-tech innovation. VC tells the riveting story of how the industry arose from the United States’ long-running orientation toward entrepreneurship. Venture capital has been driven from the start by the pull of outsized returns through a skewed distribution of payoffs―a faith in low-probability but substantial financial rewards that rarely materialize. Whether the gamble is a whaling voyage setting sail from New Bedford or the newest startup in Silicon Valley, VC is not just a model of finance that has proven difficult to replicate in other countries. It is a state of mind exemplified by an appetite for risk-taking, a bold spirit of adventure, and an unbridled quest for improbable wealth through investment in innovation.Link

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The Harvard Research Center in Entrepreneurial History and the Daimonic Entrepreneur

The Harvard Research Center in Entrepreneurial History and the Daimonic Entrepreneur. Sophus Reinert, 2017, Paper, “This paper sketches the intellectual history of the Research Center in Entrepreneurial History, founded at Harvard in 1948, which helped established the contours of business history as a discipline. This history was shaped by the rivalry between N. S. B. Gras, the “father of business history,” and Arthur H. Cole, which defined still extant polarities in the field of business history. It provides context for the emergence of the figure of the “entrepreneur,” conceived of as an ambiguous and potent force of creative destruction, and of entrepreneurship as business history’s preeminent and vital dynamic. The paper focuses on German émigré Fritz L. Redlich, who was central to the Center’s work, and whose “creative entrepreneur” was conceived in explicit relation to the daimon, the godlike, frighteningly ambiguous, and often destructive power of inspiration and creativity.Link

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The Spread of Modern Industry to the Periphery since 1871

The Spread of Modern Industry to the Periphery since 1871. Jeffrey Williamson, 2017, Book, “Explores the nineteenth- and twentieth-century spread of modern industry to the global periphery. Demonstrates how, in the twenty-first century, economies in Asia, Latin America and even sub-Saharan Africa are converging on the historically-wealthy economies of Europe and North America. Seeks to understand the economic, historical, and political implications of this shift in industry. Offers a comparative assessment of twelve regions: Russia, East-Central Europe, Southeast Europe, Italy, the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia, China, Northern Latin America, and Southern Latin America.Link

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The Spread of Modern Industry to the Periphery since 1871

The Spread of Modern Industry to the Periphery since 1871. Jeffrey Williamson, 2017, Paper, “Ever since the Industrial Revolution of the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries, industrialization has been the key to modern economic growth. The fact that modern industry originated in Britain, and spread initially to north-western Europe and North America, implied a dramatic divergence in living standards between the industrial North (or ‘West’) and a non-industrial, or even de-industrializing, South (or ‘Rest’). This nineteenth-century divergence, which had profound economic, military, and geopolitical implications, has been studied in great detail by many economists and historians. Today, this divergence between the ‘West’ and the ‘Rest’ is visibly unravelling, as economies in Asia, Latin America and even sub-Saharan Africa converge on the rich economies of Europe and North America. This phenomenon, which is set to define the twenty-first century, both economically and politically, has also been the subject of a considerable amount of research.Link

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The Origins of High-Tech Venture Investing in America

The Origins of High-Tech Venture Investing in America. Tom Nicholas, October 2015, Book Chapter. “The United States has developed an unparalleled environment for the provision of high-tech investment finance. Today it is reflected in the strength of agglomeration economies in Silicon Valley, but historically its origins lay in the East Coast. Notably, the New England Council’s immediate post-WWII efforts to create the American Research and Development Corporation created a precedent for “long-tail” high-tech investing. This approach became institutionalized in America over subsequent decades in a way that has been difficult to replicate in other countries. The role of history helps to explain why.Link

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Making ‘Green Giants’: Environment Sustainability in the German Chemical Industry, 1950s–1980s

Making ‘Green Giants’: Environment Sustainability in the German Chemical Industry, 1950s–1980s. Geoffery G. Jones, April 2014, Paper. “This article examines the evolution of corporate environmentalism in the West German chemical industry between the 1950s and the 1980s. It focuses on two companies, Bayer and Henkel, that have been identified as “green giants,” and traces the evolution of their environmental strategies in response to growing evidence of pollution and resulting political pressures. The variety of capitalism literature has suggested that…” May require purchase or user account. Link Verified October 11, 2014

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Waste, Recycling and Entrepreneurship in Central and Northern Europe, 1870–1940

Waste, Recycling and Entrepreneurship in Central and Northern Europe, 1870–1940. Geoffery G. Jones, March 4, 2014, Paper. “This working paper examines the role of entrepreneurs in the municipal solid waste industry in industrialized central and northern Europe from the late nineteenth century to the 1940s. It explores the emergence of numerous German, Danish, and other European entrepreneurial firms explicitly devoted to making a profitable business out of conserving and returning valuable resources to productive use…” Link Verified October 11, 2014

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Firms and Global Capitalism

Firms and Global Capitalism. Geoffrey G. Jones, March 2014, Book Chapter. “The second volume of The Cambridge History of Capitalism provides an authoritative reference on the spread and impact of capitalism across the world, and the varieties of responses to it. Employing a wide geographical coverage and strong comparative outlook, a team of leading scholars explore the global consequences that capitalism has had for industry, agriculture and trade, along with the reactions by governments, firms and markets…” May require purchase or user account. Link Verified October 11, 2014

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