Found 3 article(s) for author 'bond market'

Jeremy Stein on income inequality, monetary policy and the bond market, and preventing the next financial crisis

Jeremy Stein on income inequality, monetary policy and the bond market, and preventing the next financial crisis February 2019. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Jeremy Stein, the Moise Y. Safra Professor of Economics and Chairman of the Department of Economics at Harvard University, on income inequality, monetary policy and the bond market, and preventing the next […]

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Corporate Bond Liquidity: A Revealed Preference Approach

Corporate Bond Liquidity: A Revealed Preference Approach. Adi Sunderam, March 20, 2018, Paper, “We propose a novel measure of bond market liquidity that does not depend on transaction data. Capturing how the strength of the relation between mutual fund cash holdings and uncertainty about fund flows varies in the cross section, our measure reflects funds’ perceived illiquidity of their portfolio holdings at a given point in time. Speculative grade and smaller bonds are perceived to be significantly less liquid, with the illiquidity of speculative grade bonds in particular deteriorating in the post-crisis period.Link

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The Fed, the Bond Market, and Gradualism in Monetary Policy

The Fed, the Bond Market, and Gradualism in Monetary Policy. Adi Sunderam, Jeremy Stein, February 2016, Paper. “We develop a model of monetary policy with two key features: (i) the central bank has some private information about its long-run target for the policy rate; and (ii) the central bank is averse to bond-market volatility. In this setting, discretionary monetary policy is gradualist: the central bank only adjusts the policy rate slowly in response to changes in its target. Such gradualism represents an attempt to not spook the bond market. However, this effort is unsuccessful in equilibrium, as long-term rates rationally react more to a given move in short rates when the central bank moves more gradually. The same desire to mitigate bond-market volatility can lead the central bank to lower short rates sharply when publicly-observed term premiums rise. In both cases, there is a time-consistency problem, and society would be better off with a central banker who cares less about the bond market.Link

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