Found 6 article(s) for author 'benefits'

How do Private Equity Fees Vary Across Public Pensions?

How do Private Equity Fees Vary Across Public Pensions? Emil Siriwardane, January 2020, Paper, “We document large variation in net-of-fee performance across public pension funds investing in the same private equity fund. In aggregate, these differences imply that the pensions in our sample would have earned $45 billion more – equivalent to $8.50 more per $100 invested – had they each received the best observed terms in the irrespective funds. There are also large pension-effects in the sense that some pensions systematically pay more fees than others when investing in the same fund. With better terms, the 95th percentile pension would have earned $14.91 more per $100 invested compared to $1.12 for the 5th percentile pension. Attributes like size, relationships, and governance account for a modest amount of the pension effects, meaning similar pensions consistently pay different fees.” Link

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Why Firms Offer Paid Parental Leave: An Exploratory Study

Why Firms Offer Paid Parental Leave: An Exploratory Study. Claudia Goldin, January 2020, Paper, “Why do competitive firms in the US provide paid parental leave (PPL)? Which firms do and to what extent? We use several firm- and individual-level data sets to answer these questions. These include the BLS-Employee Benefit Survey (EBS) for 2010 to 2018 and an extensive firm-level data collection that we compiled. Our work is undergirded by a two-period model with competitive firms whose workers vary by their optimal firm-specific training and the probability that each will remain on the job after PPL is taken. We find that firm-provided PPL has greatly increased in the last two decades and generally covers new fathers. The levels of provision differ greatly by the industry, firm size, and the degree of firm-specific training. But even the top-of-the-line firm in the US provides fewer fully paid parental weeks than does the median OECD nation.Link

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From Dollars to Sense: Placing a Monetary Value on Non-Cash Compensation Encourages Employees to Value Time over Money

From Dollars to Sense: Placing a Monetary Value on Non-Cash Compensation Encourages Employees to Value Time over Money.  Ashley Whillans, 2019, Paper, “When deciding where to work, employees may focus too much on salary and not enough on non cash benefits such as paid time-off, potentially undermining their long-term happiness. We propose a simple solution to encourage employees to recognize the value of non-cash benefits: list the financial value of non-cash compensation. Results from one archival data set (n = 42,271) and eight studies (n = 3,190) provide evidence for these ideas. First, as expected, employees who receive non-cash compensation are happier than employees who do not. Yet, prospective employees underestimate the happiness benefit of non-cash benefits. Second, and most critically, prospective employees are more likely to choose jobs with greater non-cash benefits and lower salaries when the cash value of these non-cash benefits are listed.Link

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The Caring Company: How Employers Can Cut Costs And Boost Productivity By Helping Employees Manage Caregiving Needs

The Caring Company: How Employers Can Cut Costs And Boost Productivity By Helping Employees Manage Caregiving Needs. Joseph Fuller, January 16, 2019, “By investing in a care culture, American companies can prepare themselves for the looming care crisis. The economics of care are misaligned in most companies. Employees don’t get the support they need for their caregiving responsibilities and employers pay the hidden costs, including turnover, rehiring, presenteeism, and absenteeism.Link

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Why We Don’t Value Flextime Enough

Why We Don’t Value Flextime Enough. Michael Luca, March 3, 2017, Opinion, “Earlier this month, the city council in Copenhagen voted unanimously to give all municipal workers greater control over their schedules. The city’s 10,000 employees will work the same number of hours as before but with greater freedom to decide when that…Link

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