Found 6 article(s) for author 'Amitabh Chandra'

Trickle-down innovation and the longevity of nations

Trickle-down innovation and the longevity of nations. Amitabh Chandra, June 1, 2019, Paper, “The association between income and life expectancy is so robust and persistent across countries that it has a name, the Preston Curve, named after the economist who first described it. 1 The strength of the association begs the question: must citizens of poorer countries wait for their economies to grow before they can expect to enjoy the life expectancies of wealthier nations? Or can longevity improve, even in the absence of economic gains? The answer has important implications for human wellbeing around the world.Link

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Tyler Cowen and Amitabh Chandra on economics of health care

Tyler Cowen and Amitabh Chandra on economics of health care. Amitabh Chandra, June 12, 2018, Audio, “Two prominent economists share their views on the politics, economics and ethics of health care reform. Tyler Cowen is professor of economics at George Mason University and the Center for the Study of Public Choice and has earned numerous accolades, including being named a Top 100 Global Thinker by Foreign Policy. He is also one of The Economist’s most influential economists of the decade.Link

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Policy Strategies For Aligning Price And Value For Brand-Name Pharmaceuticals

Policy Strategies For Aligning Price And Value For Brand-Name Pharmaceuticals. Amitabh Chandra, February 16, 2018, Paper, “Systemic factors in the US health care system lead to greater pricing power for drug manufacturers than is the case in other countries. The result is higher prices that are often poorly aligned with the degree of added benefit for patients and the health system. To achieve the difficult balance between necessary incentives for innovation and affordability, many economists favor “value-based” pricing, in which the price for a new drug reflects an assessment of the comparative effectiveness of the drug compared to other available treatments. In this brief we explore the different varieties of value-based pricing, and we outline several measures through which drug competition may be increased, supported by regulatory steps and payment mechanisms to bring drug prices into greater alignment with their underlying clinical value.Link

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Challenges To Reducing Discrimination And Health Inequity Through Existing Civil Rights Laws

Challenges To Reducing Discrimination And Health Inequity Through Existing Civil Rights Laws. Amitabh Chandra, June 2017, Paper, “More than fifty years after the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, health care for racial and ethnic minorities remains in many ways separate and unequal in the United States. Moreover, efforts to improve minority health care face challenges that differ from those confronted during de jure segregation. We review these challenges and examine whether stronger enforcement of existing civil rights legislation could help overcome them. We conclude that stronger enforcement of existing laws—for example, through executive orders to strengthen enforcement of the laws and congressional action to allow private individuals to bring lawsuits against providers who might have engaged in discrimination—would improve minority health care, but this approach is limited in what it can achieve.Link

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Healthcare Exceptionalism? Performance and Allocation in the U.S. Healthcare Sector

Healthcare Exceptionalism? Performance and Allocation in the U.S. Healthcare Sector. Amitabh Chandra, October 1, 2015, Paper. “The conventional wisdom in health economics is that idiosyncratic features of the healthcare sector leave little scope for market forces to allocate consumers to higher performance producers. However, we find robust evidence across a variety of conditions and performance measures that higher quality hospitals tend to have higher market shares at a point in time and expand more over time. Moreover, we find that the relationship between performance and allocation is stronger among patients who have greater…” Link

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Association between Income and the Hippocampus

Association between Income and the Hippocampus. Amitabh Chandra, May 4, 2011, Paper. “Facets of the post-natal environment including the type and complexity of environmental stimuli, the quality of parenting behaviors, and the amount and type of stress experienced by a child affects brain and behavioral functioning. Poverty is a type of pervasive experience that is likely to influence biobehavioral processes because children developing in such environments often encounter high levels of stress and reduced environmental stimulation. This study explores the association between socioeconomic status and the hippocampus, a brain region involved in learning and memory that is known to be affected by stress. We employ a voxel-based morphometry analytic framework with region of interest drawing for structural brain images acquired from participants across the socioeconomic spectrum (n = 317) …” Link

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