Found 17 article(s) for author 'Alexandra Killewald'

Racial wealth inequality: Social problems and solutions

Racial wealth inequality: Social problems and solutions. Alexandra Killewald, June 3, 2019, Video, “White college graduates have over seven times more wealth than black college graduates and nearly four times more wealth than Latino college graduates. White single parents have roughly two times more wealth than two-parent black and Latino households. Rather than education, family structure, or conspicuous consumption, scholars point to historic policies (e.g., Homestead Act, GI Bill, Social Security) that have excluded minorities from having similar wealth-building opportunities as white individuals. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that discrimination and structural racism are among contemporary drivers that prevent minority communities from obtaining equitable housing loans, adequate neighborhood resources (such as grocery stores and healthcare services), and access to jobs and education. A series of policy solutions including student loan forgiveness, universal basic income, federal job guarantee, baby bonds, and reparations have been presented as potential solutions.Link

 

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Intergenerational Wealth Mobility and Racial Inequality

Intergenerational Wealth Mobility and Racial Inequality. Alexandra Killewald, 2019, Paper, “The black-white gap in household wealth is large and well documented. Here, we visualize how this racial wealth gap persists across generations. Animating the flow of individuals between the relative wealth position of parents and their adult children, we show that the disadvantage of black families is a consequence both of wealth inequality in prior generations and race differences in the transmission of wealth positions across generations: Black children both have less wealthy parents on average and are far more likely to be downwardly mobile in household wealth. By displaying intergenerational movements between parental and offspring wealth quintiles, we underline how intergenerational fluctuation coexists with the maintenance of a severely racialized wealth structure.Link

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For Richer: The Effects of Marriage on Wealth Accumulation

For Richer: The Effects of Marriage on Wealth Accumulation. Alexandra Killewald, 2018, Paper, “Marriage is widely considered to benefit individuals’ economic well-being, including their net worth. Yet establishing the role of marriage in wealth generation is complicated by the dynamic and reciprocal nature of marriage and wealth: marriage is both the result of prior wealth and a potential determinant of future wealth. We use data from the NLSY79 and marginal structural models that account for these dynamic selection processes to estimate the effect marital histories on midlife wealth.Link

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Wealth Inequality and Accumulation

Wealth Inequality and Accumulation. Alexandra Killewald, July 2017, Paper, “Research on wealth inequality and accumulation and the data upon which it relies have expanded substantially in the twenty-first century. Although the field has experienced rapid growth, conceptual and methodological challenges remain. We begin by discussing two major unresolved methodological concerns facing wealth research: how to address challenges to causal inference posed by wealth’s cumulative nature and how to operationalize net worth given its highly skewed distribution. Next, we provide an overview of data sources available for wealth research. To underscore the need for continued empirical attention to net worth, we review trends in wealth levels and inequality and evaluate wealth’s distinctiveness as an indicator of social stratification. We then review recent empirical evidence on the effects of wealth on other social outcomes, as well as research on the determinants of wealth. We close with a list of promising avenues for future research on wealth, its causes, and its consequences.Link

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Generations of Advantage: Multigenerational Correlations in Family Wealth

Generations of Advantage: Multigenerational Correlations in Family Wealth. Alexandra Killewald, June 2017, Paper, “Inequality in family wealth is high, yet we know little about how much and how wealth inequality is maintained across generations. We argue that a long-term, life-course perspective reflective of wealth’s cumulative nature is crucial to understand the extent and channels of wealth reproduction across generations. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics that span nearly half a century, we show that a one decile increase in parental wealth position is associated with an increase of about 4 percentiles in offspring wealth position in adulthood.Link

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Does Your Home Make You Wealthy?

Does Your Home Make You Wealthy? Alexandra Killewald, November 16, 2016, Paper, “Estimating the lifetime wealth consequences of homeownership is complicated by ongoing events, such as divorce or inheritance, that may shape both homeownership decisions and later-life wealth. We argue that prior research that has not accounted for these dynamic selection processes has overstated the causal effect of homeownership on wealth. Using NLSY79 data and marginal structural models, we find that each additional year of homeownership increases midlife wealth in 2008 by about $6,800, more than 25 percent less than estimates from models that do not account for dynamic selection. Hispanic and African American wealth benefits from each homeownership year are 62 percent and 48 percent as large as those of whites, respectively.” Link

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How Rigid is the Wealth Structure and Why? A Life-Course Perspective on Intergenerational Correlations in Wealth

How Rigid is the Wealth Structure and Why? A Life-Course Perspective on Intergenerational Correlations in Wealth. Alexandra Killewald, July 2016, Paper, “Inequality in family wealth is high and rising. Yet we know little about how much and how wealth inequality is maintained across generations. We argue that a long-term, life-course perspective reflective of wealth’s cumulative nature is crucial to understand the extent and channels of wealth reproduction across generations. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics that span nearly half a century, we attend to the life-cycle patterns of wealth attainment to reveal that intergenerational wealth correlations rise with age and are higher than previously believed. Furthermore, grandparental wealth is a unique predictor of grandchildren’s wealth, above and beyond the role of parental wealth, suggesting that a focus on only parentchild dyads underestimates the importance of family wealth lineages.” Link

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The Concentration of Wealth within Family Lineages and Intergenerational Transfers

The Concentration of Wealth within Family Lineages and Intergenerational Transfers. Alexandra Killewald, 2016, Paper, “Compared to income and earnings, wealth in the United States is substantially more unequally distributed (Budría Rodríguez et al. 2002; Scholz and Levine 2004). Access to wealth is in turn associated with a wide range of outcomes, including longevity, family formation, and the educational achievement and labor market outcomes of offspring (Attanasio and Emmerson 2003; Charles, Hurst, and Killewald 2013; Conley 1999, 2001; Pfeffer 2011; Bond Huie et al. 2003; Orr 2003; Schneider 2011). Furthermore, these associations are not fully explained by standard measures of socioeconomic advantage, such as income or education. The wealth distribution is thus an important measure of the concentration of social inequality and advantage.Link

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Tethered Lives: A Couple-Based Perspective on the Consequences of Parenthood for Time Use, Occupation, and Wages

Tethered Lives: A Couple-Based Perspective on the Consequences of Parenthood for Time Use, Occupation, and Wages. Alexandra Killewald, March 2016, Paper. “Prior research on parenthood effects has typically used single-sex models and estimated average effects. By contrast, we estimate population-level variability in partners’ changes in housework hours, paid work hours, occupation traits, and wages after becoming parents, and we explore whether one partner’s adjustment offsets or supplements the other’s. We find tradeoffs between spouses on paid work adjustments to parenthood, but complementarity in adjustments to housework hours, occupation traits, and wages. The effect of parenthood on wives’ behaviors is larger and more variable than husbands’ in every domain.Link

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Mothers’ Long-Term Employment Patterns

Mothers’ Long-Term Employment Patterns. Alexandra Killewald, 2015, Paper. “Previous research on maternal employment has disproportionately focused on married, college-educated mothers and examined either current employment status or postpartum return to employment. Following the life course perspective, we instead conceptualize maternal careers as long-term life course patterns. Using data from the NLSY79 and optimal matching, we document four common employment patterns of American mothers over the first 18 years of maternity. About two-thirds follow steady patterns, either full-time employment (38 percent) or steady nonemployment (24 percent). The rest experience “mixed” patterns: long-term part-time employment (20 percent), or a multiyear period of nonemployment following maternity, then a return to employment (18 percent). Consistent employment following maternity, either full-time or part-time, is characteristic of women with more economic advantages …Link

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