Found 24 article(s) for author 'Africa'

Clayton Christensen on what it would take to develop Africa

Clayton Christensen on what it would take to develop Africa. Clayton Christensen, January 23, 2019, Video, “Gearing up for prosperity requires a change of thinking, CNBC Africa spoke with one of New York’s best sellers Clayton Christensen, a professor of business administration and Harvard University’s Business School about what it would take to develop Africa.Link

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Harnessing University Strengths in Multi-Sectoral Collaborations for Planetary Health

Harnessing University Strengths in Multi-Sectoral Collaborations for Planetary Health. Calestous Juma, August 2918, Paper, “While significant achievements in human health have been made globally, progress has been made possible, in part, through unconstrained use of natural resources. As the health of our planet worsens, human health is also endangered. Scholars and policymakers from diverse disciplines highlighted complex, multi-sectoral approaches for addressing poor dietary intake, over- and under-nutrition, and increasing chronic diseases in sub-Saharan Africa at the “Agriculture, Nutrition, Health, and the Environment in Africa” Conference held at Harvard University on November 6th and 7th, 2017.Link

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Global Markets and Inequality in African Countries

Global Markets and Inequality in African Countries. Eric Maskin, 2018, Paper, “Globalization has had a big impact on many African countries in the last 20 years. It has provided a considerably expanded market for their exports; allowed them to specialize more in products for which they have a comparative advantage; and given their consumers access to an array of goods that they would not otherwise enjoy. In addition, it has led to impressive GDP growth in much of Africa, and has been an important force for improving average prosperity.Link

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An Economic Rationale for the West African Scramble? The Commercial Transition and the Commodity Price Boom of 1835-1885

An Economic Rationale for the West African Scramble? The Commercial Transition and the Commodity Price Boom of 1835-1885. Jeffrey Williamson, March 2018, Paper, “We use a new trade dataset showing that nineteenth century Sub-Saharan Africa experienced a terms of trade boom comparable to other parts of the ‘global periphery’. A sharp rise in export prices in the five decades before the scramble (1835-1885) was followed by an equally impressive decline during the colonial era. This study revises the view that the scramble for West Africa occurred when its major export markets were in decline and argues that the larger weight of West Africa in French imperial trade strengthened the rationale for French instead of British initiative in the conquest of the interior.Link

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Moving beyond the green revolution in Africa’s new era of hunger

Moving beyond the green revolution in Africa’s new era of hunger. Calestous Juma, December 7, 2017, Paper, “A quarter of the world’s hungry people are in sub-Saharan Africa and the numbers are growing. Between 2015 and 2016, the number of hungry – those in distress and unable to access enough calories for a healthy and productive life – grew from 20.8% to 22.7%. The number of undernourished rose from 200 million to 224 million out of a total population of 1.2 billion.Link

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How Africa can negotiate an effective continental free trade area agreement

How Africa can negotiate an effective continental free trade area agreement. Calestous Juma, November 14, 2017, Opinion, “African countries are forging ahead to complete negotiations for a continental free trade area between 55 countries by early next year. The idea, adopted by the African Union in 2012, is to create a single market which includes the free movement of goods, services and people. The integrated African market covers 1.2 billion people and a combined GDP of over USD$3.5 trillion.Link

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Political institutions and economic growth in Africa’s ‘Renaissance’

Political institutions and economic growth in Africa’s ‘Renaissance’. Robert H. Bates, October 11, 2017, Paper, “In the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, many African states replaced authoritarian political regimes with competitive electoral systems; the economies of many also began to grow, some for the first time in decades. We argue that democratic reform led to economic growth, as did Acemoglu, Naidu, Restrepo and Robinson in an earlier paper. Our approach differs from theirs in that while we to seek to identify a causal relationship between democracy and development, we build our analysis around the qualitative accounts of regional specialists and the reasoning of political economists. Where others test for the existence of a causal account, we test for the existence of specific casual mechanisms.Link

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Politics, Academics, and Africa

Politics, Academics, and Africa. Robert Bates, 2017, Paper, “The roots of my fascination with politics and Africa run deep; so too does my need for clarity. The combination drove me into the professoriate. My research in Africa convinced me that modernization theory was wrong: The people I came to know in the field were sophisticated in their politics. Additional research convinced me that market-oriented approaches to political economy were wrong and that government intervention could lead to increases in productivity and welfare. Because neoclassical approaches are flexible, I continue to think in terms of strategy and choice and to apply them to the study of development.Link

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Understanding the long-run effects of Africa’s slave trades

Understanding the long-run effects of Africa’s slave trades. Nathan Nunn, February 27, 2017, Paper, “Evidence suggests that Africa’s slave trades played an important part in the shaping of the continent not only in terms of economic outcomes, but cultural and social outcomes as well. This column, taken from a recently published VoxEU eBook, summarises studies that reveal the lasting toxic effects of Africa’s four waves of slave trades on contemporary development.Link

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Africa’s Prospects for Enjoying a Demographic Dividend

Africa’s Prospects for Enjoying a Demographic Dividend. David Bloom, August 2016, “We assess Africa’s prospects for enjoying a demographic dividend. While fertility rates and dependency ratios in Africa remain high, they have started to decline. According to UN projections, they will fall further in the coming decades such that by the mid-21st century the ratio of the working-age to dependent population will be greater than in Asia, Europe, and Northern America. This projection suggests Africa has considerable potential to enjoy a demographic dividend. Whether and when it actually materializes, and also its magnitude, hinges on policies and institutions in key realms that include macroeconomic management, human capital, trade, governance, and labor and capital markets. Given strong complementarities among these areas, coordinated policies will likely be most effective in generating the momentum needed to pull Africa’s economies out of a development trap.Link

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