Found 425 article(s) in category 'Trade Policy'

Trade Shifts Pollution More than Regs Shift Trade

Trade Shifts Pollution More than Regs Shift Trade. Joseph Aldy, September/October 2018, Paper, “Burning coal to power manufacturing
contributes to premature mortality in the United States and in developing countries alike. Despite stringent environmental regulations, U.S. coal-fired power plants still cause tens of thousands of early deaths each year. Any factor that causes manufacturing activity to shift from the United States to other countries can also shift the demand for coal-fired power — and its pollution — to these other countries.Link

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UK Competitiveness after Brexit

UK Competitiveness after Brexit. Christian Ketels, Michael Porter, 2018, Paper, “On June 23rd, 2016 52% of UK voters opted to put their country on the path to leave the European Union by March 29, 2019. This result was a surprise to many, and went against the advice of the vast majority of economic experts and business leaders. Two years later, and after a remarkable period in UK politics, key questions about the future relationship between the UK and the EU remain unresolved. Various models have been proposed; the latest one by Prime Minister May triggered the resignation of a number of key ministers. All of them struggle to deal with a fundamental tension: how to square barrier-free trade between the UK and the EU, especially across the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, with both full policy sovereignty for the UK and adherence to the ‘four freedoms’ at the heart of the EUs Single Market. A ‘no deal’ Brexit by default remains an option, despite the costs to UK businesses and the wider UK economy.Link

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Can the Trading System Survive US–China Trade Friction?

Can the Trading System Survive US–China Trade Friction? Robert Lawrence, September 13, 2018, Paper, “Donald Trump has sought to change US trading relationships by raising protection at home and taxing the offshore activities of US companies abroad. These measures, which both use and violate trade rules, have provoked retaliation from other countries. Such friction has restricted and distorted trade and investment, undermined the rules‐based trading system and perhaps permanently damaged global value chains that depend on stable rules for market access. Trump has justified some of his measures as a response to China’s alleged unfair practices and indeed, China has adopted industrial and technology policies that are formally neutral between domestic and foreign firms but in practice have led foreign firms to complain about discriminatory practices that favor Chinese firms.Link

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What Happens After China Surpasses the U.S. Economy. Bloomberg Opinion Radio

What Happens After China Surpasses the U.S. Economy. Bloomberg Opinion Radio. Noah Feldman, September 7, 2018, Audio, “Hosted by June Grasso. Guests: Sarah Halzack, Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “Nike’s Kaepernick Campaign Is Worth the Risk.” Joe Nocera, Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “Weakened Unions Explain the Lack of Wage Gains.” Daniel Moss, Bloomberg View economics editor and columnist: “What Happens After China Surpasses the U.S. Economy.” Noah Feldman, Professor at Harvard Law and Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “In America, the Press Is Free to Bury the News.” Nathaniel Bullard, energy analyst and Bloomberg View columnist: “Electric Vehicles’ Day Will Come Suddenly.”Link

 

 

 

 

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Externalities and Agricultural Import Bans: Evaluating Regionalization Measures in Light of the Russia – Pigs Dispute

Externalities and Agricultural Import Bans: Evaluating Regionalization Measures in Light of the Russia – Pigs Dispute. Mark Wu, 2018, “Article 6 of the SPS Agreement presents a series of interlinked obligations for importing and exporting countries of diseased agricultural products. The Russia – Pigs dispute raises the question of when an importing country is justified in imposing a ban on products from exporting countries unaffected by the disease, on the basis of the fact that the country is part of the same customs union as another country inflicted with the disease. This Article contends that four distinct classes of cross-border and cross-product externalities ought to play in an important role when assessing this question in the future. It discusses the possible roles to be played by bilateral, sequential, pass-through, and supply chain externalities in propagating the transmission of agricultural disease across borders through trade.Link

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Is America’s economy crushing it?

Is America’s economy crushing it? Kenneth Rogoff, August 29, 2018, Video, “As economists and Fed officials try to handicap whether the U.S. economy is “crushing it” as described by Trump’s chief economic advisor Larry Kudlow, it is fair to note there is a growing consensus that the recovery is not only sustainable but is also gaining momentum.Link

 

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Let’s Roll Back the Hyper-globalization Rules of the WTO

Let’s Roll Back the Hyper-globalization Rules of the WTO. Dani Rodrik, August 20, 2018, “The backlash against globalization seems, in the end, not to be about the comparative advantages of trade but about the overriding of domestic policy choices by a global tribunal, the World Trade Organization (WTO), which, as you put it, reaches too far into the democratic sovereignty of nations, each with their own economic models, and thus into the well-being of their citizens.Link

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Trump’s Goal With China Is Big Tariffs, Not A Deal

Trump’s Goal With China Is Big Tariffs, Not A Deal. Robert Lawrence, August 15, 2018, Audio, “Robert Lawrence, Professor of International Trade and Investment at the Harvard Kennedy School and former economic advisor to Clinton, on the deal that Trump really wants with China. Hosted by Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz.Link

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Understanding Brexit: Cultural Resentment versus Economic Grievances

Understanding Brexit: Cultural Resentment versus Economic Grievances. Pippa Norris, 2018, Paper, “This study considers the evidence for ‘demand-side’ theories seeking to explain the outcome of the Brexit referendum and subsequent divisions in UK politics. Economic theories suggest that the Leave decision was driven mainly by the ‘left-behinds’ in jobs or wages, such as those living in struggling communities in the North of England, the Midlands, and Wales. By contrast cultural accounts emphasize political attitudes and values, including long-term British suspicion about the European Union project, public disgust with the political class at Westminster, anxiety about the effects of the refugee crisis and migration from other EU countries, and opposition to the government’s austerity cuts. These theories can also be regarded as complimentary rather than rivals, for example if economic deprivation catalyzed resentment about immigrants and the rejection of open borders.Link

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