Found 425 article(s) in category 'Trade Policy'

Tariff Passthrough at the Border and at the Store: Evidence from US Trade Policy

Tariff Passthrough at the Border and at the Store: Evidence from US Trade Policy. Alberto Cavallo, Gita Gopinath, May 2019, Paper, “We use data collected at the border and at retailers to characterize the impact of recent changes in US trade policy on importers, consumers, and exporters. We start by studying the tariffs on imports of steel and Chinese goods that were imposed during 2018. We find little difference in the “at-the-dock” ex-tariff price levels and stickiness for otherwise equivalent goods that were affected and not affected. This nearly complete passthrough of tariffs to the total price paid by importers suggests the tariff incidence has fallen largely on the US. We simultaneously estimate exchange rate passthrough and find the response to be far more muted. Next, in-progress analyses of retail prices preliminarily show more heterogeneity, with the higher cost of imports passed through to consumers for some goods, such as washing machines, but absorbed by lower retailer profit margins for others, such as many from China. Finally, in contrast to imports, US exports subjected to retaliatory tariffs exhibited declines in their ex-tariff prices relative to equivalent but non-targeted goods.Link

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The Real Cost of Trump’s Tariffs

The Real Cost of Trump’s Tariffs. Jeffrey Frankel, May 23, 2019, Opinion, “Whereas winners tend to outnumber losers when trade is liberalized, raising tariffs normally has the opposite result. US President Donald Trump appears to have engineered a spectacular example of this: his trade war with China has hurt almost every segment of the US economy, and created very few winners.Link

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China Is Vulnerable But Deal Unlikely

China Is Vulnerable But Deal Unlikely. Robert Lawrence, May 17, 2019, Audio, “Robert Lawrence, Professor of International Trade and Investment at Harvard Kennedy School and former economic advisor to President Clinton, on why a China trade deal is looking unlikely in the near future. Martin Stephan, the Deputy CEO of Carbios, a French recycling biotech company, on their technology that aims for zero plastic waste. Alex Webb, Bloomberg Opinion technology columnist, discusses his column: “Amazon-Deliveroo Alliance Would Eat Uber For Dinner.” Will Rhind, CEO of GraniteShares, with his mid-year outlook on gold and oil. Hosted by Lisa Abramowicz and Paul Sweeney.Link

 

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What a wise US-China trade deal looks like? Full of trade-offs

What a wise US-China trade deal looks like? Full of trade-offs. Kenneth Rogoff, May 8, 2019, Opinion, “Will a possibly imminent US-China trade agreement exacerbate global business cycles or even plant the seeds of the next Asian financial crisis? If the eventual agreement – assuming there is one – forces China to hew indefinitely to its outmoded, overly rigid exchange-rate regime, then the answer may be yes.Link

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Dollar Dominance in Trade and Finance

Dollar Dominance in Trade and Finance. Gita Gopinath, 2019, Book Chapter, “According to the major paradigm in international macroeconomics, namely the Mundell-Fleming paradigm (Mundell 1963; Fleming 1962), the importance of a country’s currency in international trade is tied closely to its share in world trade. This is because each country is assumed to export its goods in its own currency. That is, if we consider trade among the United States, India, and Japan, the assumption is that all exports from the United States are invoiced in dollars, all exports from Japan are invoiced in yen, and all exports from India are invoiced in rupees. Further, because the paradigm assumes that prices are sticky in the exporter’s currency, exchange rate fluctuations across countries affect their bilateral terms of trade, defined as the ratio of the at-the-dock price of imports to that of exports.Link

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Peaceful Coexistence 2.0

Peaceful Coexistence 2.0. Dani Rodrik, April 10, 2019, Opinion, “Today’s Sino-American impasse is rooted in “hyper-globalism,” under which countries must open their economies to foreign companies, regardless of the consequences for their growth strategies or social models. But a global trade regime that cannot accommodate the world’s largest trading economy is a regime in urgent need of repair.Link

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Donald Trump and Xi Jinping are missing a trick over trade

Donald Trump and Xi Jinping are missing a trick over trade. Jeffrey Frankel, March 22, 2019, Opinion, “President Donald Trump has postponed until at least April the supposed deadline for concluding the United States’ trade negotiations with China. A good outcome for both sides would be reached if China agreed to protect property rights better and reduce the state’s role in its economy; the US agreed to strengthen national saving and public investment; and both sides agreed to reverse their recent tariff increases. Unfortunately, this is not the deal that is likely to materialise.Link

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Chinese slowdown impact: Here’s what experts have to say

Chinese slowdown impact: Here’s what experts have to say. Kenneth Rogoff, March 8, 2019, Video, “The Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, China’s second most powerful man, next to Xi Jinping, this week warned his country’s highest lawmaking body that the country will face a more complicated environment and grave risks and challenges. Addressing the National People’s Congress, he set the country’s economic growth at 6 to 6.5 percent this year, just a shade lower than the 6.6 percent it achieved in 2018. He also promised lower taxes and fewer burdens on the private sector. So, should the world read this warning as an indication of deeper troubles for the Chinese economy or should one be confident that China can deliver a 6 percent plus growth this year? And what does a slightly slowing China mean to the world economy?Link

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Will the US Capitulate to China?

Will the US Capitulate to China? Martin Feldstein, February 25, 2019, Opinion, “The most important problem that a bilateral deal between the United States and China needs to resolve is Chinese theft of US firms’ technology. Unless the Chinese agree to stop stealing technology, and the two sides devise a way to enforce that agreement, the US will not have achieved anything useful from Trump’s tariffs.Link

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