Found 430 article(s) in category 'Trade Policy'

On Trade Justice: A Philosophical Plea for a New Global Deal

On Trade Justice: A Philosophical Plea for a New Global Deal. Mathias Risse, October 2019, Book, “Trade has made the world. Still, trade remains an elusive and profoundly difficult area for philosophical thought. This novel account of trade justice makes ideas about exploitation central, giving pride of place to philosophical ideas about global justice but also contributing to moral disputes about practical questions. On Trade Justice is a philosophical plea for a new global deal, in continuation of, but also at appropriate distance to, post-war efforts to design a fair global-governance system in the spirit of the American New Deal of the 1930s. This book is written in the tradition of contemporary analytical philosophy but also puts its subject into a historical perspective to motivate its relevance. It covers the subject of trade justice from its theoretical foundations to a number of specific issues on which the authors’ account throws light. The state as an actor in the domain of global justice is central to the discussion but it also explores the obligations of business extensively, recognizing the importance of the modern corporation for trade. Topics such as wages injustice, collusion with authoritarian regimes, relocation decisions, and obligations arising from interaction with suppliers and sub-contractors all enter prominently. Another central actor in the domain of trade is the World Trade Organization. The WTO needs to see itself as an agent of justice. This book explores how this organization should be reformed in light of the proposals it makes. In particular, the WTO needs to endorse a human-rights and development-oriented mandate. Overall, this book hopes to make a theoretical contribution to the creation of an exploitation-free world.Link

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Trump’s Mercantilist Mess

Trump’s Mercantilist Mess. Robert Barro, September 5, 2019, Opinion, “When US President Donald Trump boasted that trade wars are “easy to win” in March 2018, it was convenient to dismiss the remark as a rhetorical flourish. Yet it is now clear that Trump meant it, because he genuinely believes the bizarre and anachronistic macroeconomic theories underlying his approach.Link

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Jeffrey Frankel Says More…

Jeffrey Frankel Says More... Jeffrey Frankel, September 2019, Opinion, “Welcome to Say More, a weekly newsletter that brings Project Syndicate’s renowned contributors closer to readers. Each issue invites a selected contributor to expand on topics covered in their commentaries, address new ones, and share recommendations, offering readers exclusive insights into the ideas, interests, and personalities of the world’s leading thinkers. This week, Project Syndicate catches up with Jeffrey Frankel, Professor of Capital Formation and Growth at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.Link

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China’s rise and the growing doubts over trade multilateralism

China’s rise and the growing doubts over trade multilateralism. Mark Wu, 2019, Book Chapter, “China’s impressive economic and technological rise in the early 21st century is unprecedented in modern times. For one, it marks the first time in the postwar era that the world’s leading trade power has embraced an economic and political model different than the traditional liberal democratic, market-oriented model associated with industrialised nations. While the world trading system has never mandated that countries within the regime conform to any economic model per se, the postwar global trade regime has always been led by countries within the Western security alliance, with the US at its fore. China, however, has sought to chart out its own path.Link

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Trump Is Losing the Trade War With China

Trump Is Losing the Trade War With China. Jason Furman, August 19, 2019, Opinion, “President Trump’s China strategy is failing. His tougher approach has yielded no meaningful Chinese concessions but is increasingly damaging the U.S. economy. Today China is more integrated with the rest of the world while the U.S. is more isolated. To combat China’s unfair, statist economic practices effectively, the U.S. must change its approach, enlisting allies and international institutions to advance a more focused set of demands.Link

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The currency manipulation game is afoot – but that’s better than a trade war

The currency manipulation game is afoot – but that’s better than a trade war. Jeffrey Frankel, August 13, 2019, Opinion, “The trade war between the United States and China is heating up again, with U.S. President Donald Trump abruptly announcing plans to impose a 10-per-cent tariff on the US$300-billion worth of imports from China that he had so far left untouched. The Chinese authorities then allowed their currency, the renminbi, to fall below the symbolic threshold of seven yuan for every U.S. dollar. The Trump administration promptly responded by naming China a “currency manipulator” – the first time the U.S. had done that to any country in 25 years. Pundits declared a currency war, and investors immediately sent global stock markets lower.Link

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The Currency Manipulation Game

The Currency Manipulation Game. Jeffrey Frankel, August 9, 2019, Opinion, “The United States government’s assertion that the recent depreciation of the renminbi amounts to currency manipulation is not true. It would be more correct to say that the Chinese authorities gave in to market pressure – the immediate source of which was US President Donald Trump’s announcement of new tariffs on Chinese goods.Link

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Pol Antràs on Trade, Taxation, Solutions for Income Inequality, and the Future of Globalization

Pol Antràs on Trade, Taxation, Solutions for Income Inequality, and the Future of Globalization August 2019. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Pol Antràs, Robert G. Ory Professor of Economics at Harvard University, on trade, taxation, solutions for income inequality, and the future of globalization. | Click here for more interviews like this one. Links: Pol Antràs’s faculty page […]

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