Found 697 article(s) in category 'Regulation'

People Over Pandas: Taiwan’s Engagement of International Human Rights Norms with Respect to Disability

People Over Pandas: Taiwan’s Engagement of International Human Rights Norms with Respect to Disability. William Alford, May 17, 2019, Book Chapter, “Taiwan’s early law (1980) regarding disability presumed a medical model—i.e., seeing disability as an individual problem rather than a societal responsibility. Facing considerable discrimination and inspired by the social model embodied elsewhere, including in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), citizen activists, including disabled persons organizations, have pressed for legislative reform. Following the earlier support of the administration of President Ma Ying-jeou for incorporation of the United Nations Human Rights Covenants into domestic law (owing to Taiwan’s being barred from formal accession), the Legislative Yuan in 2014 passed a bill designed to incorporate the CRPD into Republic of China (R.O.C) law. That measure not only retained all key provisions of the CRPD but also called on the Executive Yuan to conduct a comprehensive review of existing legal measures for compliance and pro-actively to engage persons with disabilities in implementing the new law, while also establishing innovative reporting and monitoring mechanisms intended to parallel the requirements of the CRPD. Much progress has been achieved but serious challenges remain regarding discrimination, especially with respect to employment and reasonable accommodations, while some scholars have questioned the suitability of a highly individual-focused rights-based model for Taiwanese society. Disabled persons organizations continue to play an active role both in policy and legal advocacy and in seeking to educate the public more broadly about disability.Link

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The Politics of CEOs

The Politics of CEOs. Alma Cohen, May 2019, Paper, “This paper is part of the work of the Project on Corporate Political Spending of the Harvard Law School Program on Corporate Governance. We would like to thank Lucian Bebchuk and Itay Saporta for valuable comments and discussions. We have also benefitted from invaluable research assistance by Shay Acrich, Omer Braun, Zoe Piel, and Ewelina Rudnicka. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the John M. Olin Center for Law, Economics, and Business and the Program on Corporate Governance at Harvard Law School, the Israel Science Foundation, and Tel-Aviv University. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Bureau of Economic Research.Link

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The Case For Breaking Up Big Tech

The Case For Breaking Up Big Tech. Nancy Koehn, May 15, 2015, Audio, “Calls to break up big tech companies like Facebook and Amazon are getting louder. After Sen. Elizabeth Warren called for Facebook, Google and Amazon to be designated as “platform utilities” and broken apart from their own services that compete on those platforms in March, other Democratic candidates for president have ratcheted up their own rhetoric on the issue. Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes himself has called the social network a monopoly that should be forced to shed Instagram and Whatsapp, two major recent acquisitions. Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn joined the conversation on Boston Public Radio Wednesday, delving into the history of antitrust law in America, and ultimately agreeing with those calling for breaking up big tech.Link

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Understanding and Overcoming Roadblocks to Environmental Sustainability. Past Roads and Future Prospects

Understanding and Overcoming Roadblocks to Environmental Sustainability. Past Roads and Future Prospects. Shawn Cole, 2019, Paper, “This working paper examines key barriers to business sustainability discussed at a multidisciplinary conference held at the Harvard Business School in 2018. Drawing on perspectives from both the historical and business literatures, speakers debated the historical success and future opportunities for voluntary business actions to advance sustainability. Roadblocks include misaligned incentives, missing institutions, inertia of economic systems, and the concept of sustainability itself. It appears that overcoming these roadblocks will require systematic interventions and alternative normative concepts.Link

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China’s Emissions Trading System and an ETS-Carbon Tax Hybrid

China’s Emissions Trading System and an ETS-Carbon Tax Hybrid. Dale Jorgenson, April 29, 2019, Paper, “China is introducing a national carbon emission trading system (ETS), with details yet to be finalized. The ETS is expected to cover only the major emitters but it is often argued that a more comprehensive system will achieve the emission goals at lower cost. We first examine an ETS that covers both electricity and cement sectors and consider an ambitious cap starting in 2017 that will meet the official objective to reduce the carbon-GDP intensity by 60-65% by 2030 compared to 2005 levels. The two ETS-covered industries are compensated with an output-based subsidy to represent the intention to give free permits to the covered enterprises. We then consider a hybrid system where the non-ETS sectors pay a carbon tax and share in the CO2 reduction burden. Our simulations indicate that hybrid systems will achieve the same CO2 goals with lower permit prices and GDP losses. We also show how auctioning of the permits improves the efficiency of the ETS and the hybrid systems. Finally, we find that these CO2 control policies are progressive in that higher incomes households bear a bigger burden.Link

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Harvard Professor Cass Sunstein explains how social change happens

Harvard Professor Cass Sunstein explains how social change happens. Cass Sunstein, April 14, 2019, Audio, “Brian talks to Cass Sunstein, the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Sunstein served in the Obama administration as the Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs from 2009 to 2012. In his conversation with Brian, he discusses his new book, “How Change Happens,” which answers the question of how social change happens and how change is impacted by social norms.Link

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The IRS chief must release Trump’s tax returns — and Mnuchin must not stop him

The IRS chief must release Trump’s tax returns — and Mnuchin must not stop him. Lawrence Summers, April 8, 2019, Opinion, “The House Ways and Means Committee has requested access to six years of President Trump’s tax returns. Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney has vowed that there is no way Democrats will ever get to see the returns. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has indicated that he will comply with the law, but has not said what he thinks the law requires.Link

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Jesse Fried on Inequality, Stock Buybacks, and Misplaced Fears about Short-Termism in Corporate Governance

Jesse Fried on Inequality, Stock Buybacks, and Misplaced Fears about Short-Termism in Corporate Governance March 2019. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Jesse Fried, Dane Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, on inequality, stock buybacks, and misplaced fears about short-termism in corporate governance. | Click here for more interviews like this one. Links: Jesse Fried’s faculty […]

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