Found 433 article(s) in category 'Jobs and Unemployment'

The American Dream Is Harder To Find In Some Neighborhoods

The American Dream Is Harder To Find In Some Neighborhoods. Raj Chetty, 10/1/18, Audio, “Does the neighborhood you grow up in determine how far you move up the economic ladder? A new online data tool being made public Monday finds a strong correlation between where people are raised and their chances of achieving the American dream.Link

Opportunity Atlas –

https://www.opportunityatlas.org/

 

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Racialized Re-entry: Labor Market Inequality After Incarceration

Racialized Re-entry: Labor Market Inequality After Incarceration. Bruce Western, October 1, 2018, Paper, “Why do some people succeed in the labor market after incarceration but others do not? We study the transition from prison to work with data on monthly employment and earnings for a sample of men and women observed for a year after incarceration. More than in earlier research, the data provide detailed measurement of temporary and informal employment and richly describe the labor market disadvantages of formerly incarcerated men and women. We find that half the sample is jobless in any given month and average earnings are well below the poverty level.Link

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The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation, and Growth

The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation, and Growth. Amy Edmondson, 2018, Book, “Conquer the most essential adaptation to the knowledge economy Psychological Safety at Work: How to Ensure Learning and Innovation in the Knowledge Economy offers practical guidance for teams and organizations who are serious about success in the modern economy. With so much riding on innovation, creativity, and spark, it is essential to attract and retain quality talent–but what good does this talent do if no one is able to speak their mind? The traditional culture of “fitting in” and “going along” spells doom in the knowledge economy. Success requires a continuous influx of new ideas, new challenges, and critical thought, and the interpersonal climate must not suppress, silence, ridicule or intimidate.Link

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The Slavery Incentive

The Slavery Incentive. Ricardo Hausmann, August 31, 2018, Opinion, “By restricting the workers’ outside options, employers may get them to accept terms that freer individuals would reject. That may be a reason why there is so little urgency in solving the problem of undocumented immigrants in the US, and why many countries protect citizens differently than foreigners.Link

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Stickiness on digital labour platforms and ethnic networks

Stickiness on digital labour platforms and ethnic networks. William Kerr, Christopher Stanton, August 27, 2018, Opinion, “Online labour platforms such as Upwork facilitate interactions between employers and employees for a wide range of tasks. This column provides some first evidence on flows and substitution across countries on these new digital platforms. In contrast to classic trade patterns in products, contract placements via Upwork are frequently cross-border and North-South in nature. The findings also suggest that employers leave the platform in response to wage bid increases rather than substituting away from their target search location. Diaspora networks, in particular the Indian diaspora, still matter for how contracts are placed at the global level.Link

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Presidential Address: Pension Policy and the Financial System

Presidential Address: Pension Policy and the Financial System. David Scharfstein, August 24, 2018, Paper, “In this paper, I examine the effect of pension policy on the structure of financial systems around the world. In particular, I explore the hypothesis that policies that promote pension savings also promote the development of capital markets. I present a model that endogenizes the extent to which savings are intermediated through banks or capital markets, and derive implications for corporate finance, household finance, banking, and the size of the financial sector. I then present a number of facts that are broadly consistent with the theory and examine a variety of alternative explanations of my findings.Link

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Looking for Alternatives: Pension Investments around the World, 2008 to 2017

Looking for Alternatives: Pension Investments around the World, 2008 to 2017. Victoria Ivashina, Josh Lerner, August 24, 2018, Paper, “Using hitherto-unexplored data, this paper provides a first look into pension funds’ allocations to alternative asset classes around the world. On average, in the ten years following the financial crisis, allocations to private equity and real estate nearly doubled, representing about 20% of assets under management in 2017 for pensions in many of the largest economies. Our sample indicates a $1.8 trillion shift to alternatives between 2008 and 2017. This phenomenon equally affected public and private pension funds, as well as funds of all sizes. This shift does not appear to be a consequence of mechanical factors such as increase in drawn capital or expected returns, but rather reflects a proactive portfolio allocation response to perceived investment opportunities. The extent of the shift to Alts is more pronounced for nations with lower long-term interest rate environment.Link

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Human-Capital Externalities in China

Human-Capital Externalities in China. Edward Glaeser, August 2018, Paper, “This paper provides evidences of heterogeneous human-capital externality using CHIP 2002, 2007 and 2013 data from urban China. After instrumenting city-level education using the number of relocated university departments across cities in the 1950s, one year more city-level education increases individual hourly wage by 22.0 percent, more than twice the OLS estimate. Human-capital externality is found to be greater for all groups of urban residents in the instrumental variable estimation.Link

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Identifiable Service Provider Effect: When Guilt Undermines Consumer Willingness To Buy Time

Identifiable Service Provider Effect: When Guilt Undermines Consumer Willingness To Buy Time. Ashley Whillans, 2018, Paper, “In 2011, Time Magazine rated the sharing economy as one of the top 10 ideas that would change the world. Today, the possibility of outsourcing just about anything from grocery shopping, to dog walking, to standing in line for the latest iPhone is only a few clicks away. Companies such as TaskRabbit and Hello Alfred enable customers to outsource nearly any household chore by connecting people who need tasks done with people who have time to do them. With the growing popularity of the sharing economy, it has never been easier for consumers to outsource their most dreaded tasks to others. Yet, despite the rise of the sharing economy, very little is known about when individuals decide to ‘buy time.’Link

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