Found 420 article(s) in category 'Jobs and Unemployment'

From Immigrants to Robots: The Changing Locus of Substitutes for Workers

From Immigrants to Robots: The Changing Locus of Substitutes for Workers. George Borjas, Richard Freeman, January 2019, Paper, “Increased use of robots has roused concern about how robots and other new technologies change the world of work. Using numbers of robots shipped to primarily manufacturing industries as a supply shock to an industry labor market, we estimate that an additional robot reduces employment and wages in an industry by roughly as much as an additional 2 to 3 workers and by 3 to 4 workers in particular groups, which far exceed estimated effects of an additional immigrant on employment and wages. While the growth of robots in the 1996-2016 period of our data was too modest to be a major determinant of wages and employment, the estimated coefficients suggest that continued exponential growth of robots could disrupt job markets in the foreseeable future and thus merit attention from labor analysts.Link

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The Caring Company: How Employers Can Cut Costs And Boost Productivity By Helping Employees Manage Caregiving Needs

The Caring Company: How Employers Can Cut Costs And Boost Productivity By Helping Employees Manage Caregiving Needs. Joseph Fuller, January 16, 2019, “By investing in a care culture, American companies can prepare themselves for the looming care crisis. The economics of care are misaligned in most companies. Employees don’t get the support they need for their caregiving responsibilities and employers pay the hidden costs, including turnover, rehiring, presenteeism, and absenteeism.Link

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Labor Market Shocks and the Demand for Trade Protection: Evidence from Online Surveys

Labor Market Shocks and the Demand for Trade Protection: Evidence from Online Surveys. Rafael Di Tella, Dani Rodrik, January 16, 2019, Paper, “We study preferences for government action in response to layoffs resulting from different types of labor-market shocks. We consider the following shocks: technological change, a demand shift, bad management, and three kinds of international outsourcing. Respondents are given a choice among no government action, compensatory transfers, and trade protection. In response to these shocks, support for government intervention generally rises sharply and is heavily biased towards trade protection. Demand for import protection increases significantly in all cases, except for the “bad management” shock. Trade shocks generate more demand for protectionism, and among trade shocks, outsourcing to a developing country elicits greater demand for protectionism than outsourcing to a developed country. The “bad management” shock is the only scenario that induces a desired increase in compensatory transfers; it is also the only case without a significant increase in desired trade protection. Effects appear to be heterogeneous across subgroups with different political preferences and education. In particular, Trump supporters are more protectionist than Clinton supporters. But preferences seem malleable and easy to manipulate: Clinton supporters primed with trade shocks are as protectionist as baseline Trump voters.Link

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The Left’s Choice

The Left’s Choice. Dani Rodrik, January 8, 2019, Opinion, “In the face of resurgent right-wing populism, the left’s relative weakness partly reflects the decline of unions and organized labor groups, which have historically formed the backbone of leftist and socialist movements. But four decades of ideological abdication has also played an important role.Link

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The Trump Tax Cuts Boosted Growth and Jobs, but at What Cost?

The Trump Tax Cuts Boosted Growth and Jobs, but at What Cost? Jason Furman, December 18, 2018, Opinion, “It has been nearly a year since President Trump signed sweeping tax changes into law. The macroeconomic data already rule out some of the more extravagant claims about immediate jumps in wages and capital. But the more serious debate over the tax cuts’ long-run impact is still far from decided. Here’s what we do know..Link

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The Twin Track Model of Employee Voice: An Anglo-American Perspective

The Twin Track Model of Employee Voice: An Anglo-American Perspective. Richard Freeman, 2018, Book Chapter, “This chapter will review the major studies undertaken in the twenty-first century to assess the changing nature of employee voice in the Anglo-American context. These studies are predominantly based on employee perceptions but also include …Link

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Cracking the organizational challenge of pursuing joint social and financial goals: Social enterprise as a laboratory to understand hybrid organizing

Cracking the organizational challenge of pursuing joint social and financial goals: Social enterprise as a laboratory to understand hybrid organizing. Julie Battilana, 2018, Paper, “While in recent decades the social and business sectors have evolved on fairly separate tracks, today companies are increasingly expected to generate social value in addition to profit. As a result, they also increasingly face the distinct challenge of pursuing social and financial goals at the same time. Social enterprises have a great deal of experience dealing with this challenge, as hybrid organizations that combine aspects of typical businesses (undertaking commercial activity) and not-for-profit organizations (pursuing a social mission). In this essay, I discuss my research, as well as that of others, on social enterprises, with the objective of tracing my perspective on the current state of knowledge regarding social enterprises and their capacity to pursue joint social and financial goals over time.Link

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Why Do Americans Prefer Workplace Equality Over Equality At Home?

Why Do Americans Prefer Workplace Equality Over Equality At Home? Nancy Koehn, December 12, 2018, Audio, “A new study set to be published in the journal Gender and Society found that there is a gap in Americans’ ideology around gender roles at the workplace and at home. About a quarter of the people surveyed from 1977 to 2016 believe that while women should have the same opportunities in the workplace, they should still be doing the majority of the home and child care, according to a New York Times article about the study.Link

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