Found 415 article(s) in category 'Innovation'

Innovation, competition and sectoral evolution: an introduction to the special section on Industrial Dynamics

Innovation, competition and sectoral evolution: an introduction to the special section on Industrial Dynamics. Gary Pisano, March 29, 2019, Paper, “This paper is the introduction to the ICC special section on Industrial Dynamics. Industrial dynamics has a venerable heritage in economics and after a long dormant period, it has witnessed a major resurgence beginning in the early 1980s. The current Special Section takes stock of the progress along this new and rich intellectual journey. This Introduction does not aim to present a review of the accomplishments reached in the last period. Rather, it reflects on the broad themes characterizing our progress in understanding industry evolution and industrial dynamics.Link

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What’s Really Driving Disruption (It’s Not Technology)

What’s Really Driving Disruption (It’s Not Technology). Thales Teixeira, March 28, 2019, Audio, “The emergence of a new technology is often cited as what drives the disruption of an industry or business. But that’s not true in most cases, according to Harvard Business School professor Thales Teixeira. Instead, startups disrupt established companies by decoupling the customer value chain — picking one aspect of the business and doing it better than the incumbent.Link

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The Art of Governing Through Questions

The Art of Governing Through Questions. Jorrit de Jong, Jack Goldsmith, March 25, 2019, Opinion, “When citizens ask mayors questions, they expect answers. Elected officials, in turn, want to be seen as strong leaders who are quick with solutions. Mayors are also tasked with putting out fires, both figuratively and literally, that directly affect the lives of their citizens.Link

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The Case for a Bold Economics

The Case for a Bold Economics. Dani Rodrik, March 11, 2019, Opinion, “Although economists are well positioned to imagine new institutional arrangements, their habit of thinking at the margin and sticking close to the evidence at hand encourages an aversion to radical change. But, when presented with new challenges, economists must envision new solutions – as a new group is determined to do.Link

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What Green New Deal advocates can learn from the 2009 economic stimulus act

What Green New Deal advocates can learn from the 2009 economic stimulus act. Joseph Aldy, February 15, 2019, Opinion, “Congressional Democrats have introduced a “Green New Deal” proposal that calls for a 10-year national mobilization to curb climate change by shifting the U.S. economy away from fossil fuels. Many progressives support this idea, while skeptics argue that a decade is not long enough to remake our nation’s energy system.Link

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Unlocking the Customer Value Chain

Unlocking the Customer Value Chain. Thales Teixeira, February 2019, Book, “Based on eight years of research visiting dozens of startups, tech companies and incumbents, Harvard Business School professor Thales Teixeira shows how and why consumer industries are disrupted, and what established companies can do about it—while highlighting the specific strategies potential startups use to gain a competitive edge.  There is a pattern to digital disruption in an industry, whether the disruptor is Uber, Airbnb, Dollar Shave Club, Pillpack or one of countless other startups that have stolen large portions of market share from industry leaders, often in a matter of a few years.Link

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Tarun Khanna Talks Trust with Knowledge@Wharton

Tarun Khanna Talks Trust with Knowledge@Wharton. Tarun Khanna, February 14, 2019, Audio, “In his book, Professor Khanna discusses the inherent trust that comes with the established customs and institutions of the developed world — through contracts, regulatory bodies, and so on — but this practice is seen less in the developing world. As a result, entrepreneurs looking to work in the developing world must first build a basis of trust with the individuals they’ll be working with if they want to be successful.” Link

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Yes, Sustainability Can Be a Strategy

Yes, Sustainability Can Be a Strategy. George Serafeim, February 11, 2019, Opinion, “In recent years, a growing number of companies around the world have voluntarily adopted and implemented a broad range of sustainability practices. The accelerating rate of adoption of these practices has also provoked a debate about the nature of sustainability and its long-term implications for organizations. Is the adoption of sustainability practices a form of strategic differentiation that can lead to superior financial performance? Or, is it a strategic necessity that can ensure corporate survival but not necessarily outperformance?Link

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Establishing a Center of Excellence to Scale and Sustain Open Innovation

Establishing a Center of Excellence to Scale and Sustain Open Innovation. Karim Lakhani, February 7, 2019, Paper, “Organizations face many issues in scaling and sustaining successful pilot programs in open innovation. This paper describes a set of recommendations to accelerate these practices in order to develop a Center of Excellence (CoE) that can increase adoption. The experience of the Human Health and Performance Directorate (HH&P) at the NASA Johnson Space Center spanned more than seven years from initially learning about open innovation to the successful establishment of a CoE; this paper provides recommendations on how to decrease this timeline to three to four years. Organizations must anticipate success with initial pilot programs and conduct many future activities in parallel to achieve the recommended timeline. Simultaneously, organizations must develop strategies to overcome the internal resistance and cultural barriers to finding novel ideas and solutions to fully realize the potential of open innovation.Link

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How Big Companies Can Innovate Like Small Startups

How Big Companies Can Innovate Like Small Startups. Gary Pisano, January 30, 2019, Audio, “Gary Pisano, professor of business administration at Harvard, rejects the narrative that only scrappy startups are nimble enough to innovate. He believes large, established firms can adapt and evolve, but they have to go about it differently than their small-sized competitors.Link

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