Found 635 article(s) in category 'Inequality'

Globalization and Inequality

Globalization and Inequality. Elhanan Helpman, 2018, Book, “Globalization is not the primary cause of rising inequality. This may come as a surprise. Inequality within nations has risen steadily in recent decades, at a time when countries around the world have eased restrictions on the movement of goods, capital, and labor. Many assume a causal relationship, which has motivated opposition to policies that promote freer trade. Elhanan Helpman shows, however, in this timely study that this assumption about the effects of globalization is more myth than fact.Link

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Development Ethics as Reflected in the Right to Development

Development Ethics as Reflected in the Right to Development. Stephen Marks, 2018, Book Chapter, “One of the most salient contradictions of human rights in international development is the fact that there exists a human rights instrument that directly addresses all agreedupon ethical principles of development, as defined in this handbook (See Chapter 1 above.) and yet implementation of that instrument is mired in “political theatre” and consequently is inoperable. Indeed, the Declaration on the Right to Development (DRTD), which was adopted by UN General Assembly (GA) on 4 December 1986 (UN 1986), addresses directly all seven values analyzed by this handbook and efforts to clarify the meaning of its ten articles through expert inputs provided to the United Nations have been even more explicit on these ethical principles.Link

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Alberto Alesina on Inequality, Immigration, and Austerity

Alberto Alesina on Inequality, Immigration, and Austerity July 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Alberto Alesina, the Nathaniel Ropes Professor of Political Economy at Harvard University, on inequality, immigration, and austerity. | Click here for more interviews like this one. Links: Alberto Alesina’s faculty page at Harvard | Publications | NBER research page | Wikipedia Growthpolicy.org. […]

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Implementation Ups and Downs: Monitoring Attendance to Improve Public Services for the Poor in India

Implementation Ups and Downs: Monitoring Attendance to Improve Public Services for the Poor in India. Rema Hanna, July 14, 2018, Paper, “High levels of absenteeism among health workers and teachers have negative effects on citizen health and human capital development. An attendance-monitoring intervention in schools reduced absenteeism and improved test scores, but the impact on health care workers was limited.Link

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Falling Behind: The Role of Inter- and Intragenerational Processes in Widening Racial and Ethnic Wealth Gaps through Early and Middle Adulthood

Falling Behind: The Role of Inter- and Intragenerational Processes in Widening Racial and Ethnic Wealth Gaps through Early and Middle Adulthood. Alexandra Killewald, July 13, 2018, Paper, “Whites’ wealth advantage compared to blacks and Hispanics is vast and increases with age. While prior research on wealth gaps focuses primarily on wealth levels, we adopt a life-course perspective that treats wealth as a cumulative outcome and examine wealth accumulation across individuals’ lives. We test to what extent intergenerational disadvantage and disparities in achieved characteristics explain accumulation disparities. We hypothesize that disparities in wealth determinants, like income and education, family and household characteristics, and homeownership and local context, increase through early and middle adulthood, widening wealth accumulation gaps.Link

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Good Credit and the Good Life: Credit Scores Predict Subjective Well-Being

Good Credit and the Good Life: Credit Scores Predict Subjective Well-Being. Ashley Whillans, 2018, Paper, “Can money buy happiness? To examine this question, research in economics, psychology, and sociology has focused almost exclusively on examining the associations between income,
spending or wealth and subjective well-being. Moving beyond this research, we provide the first empirical evidence that credit scores uniquely predict happiness. Across two samples, from the United Kingdom (N=615) and the United States (N=768), credit scores predicted life satisfaction even after controlling for a range of financial covariates, including income, spending, savings, debt, and home-ownership. Respondents with higher credit scores felt more optimistic about their future, promoting happiness.Link

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Global Markets and Inequality in African Countries

Global Markets and Inequality in African Countries. Eric Maskin, 2018, Paper, “Globalization has had a big impact on many African countries in the last 20 years. It has provided a considerably expanded market for their exports; allowed them to specialize more in products for which they have a comparative advantage; and given their consumers access to an array of goods that they would not otherwise enjoy. In addition, it has led to impressive GDP growth in much of Africa, and has been an important force for improving average prosperity.Link

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Ed Glaeser on the Future of Employment, Inequality, Poverty, and Joblessness in America

Ed Glaeser on the Future of Employment, Inequality, Poverty, and Joblessness in America July 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Ed Glaeser, the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard University, on the future of employment, inequality, poverty, and joblessness in America. | Click here for more interviews like this one. Links: Ed Glaeser’s […]

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Welfare and Distributional Impacts of Fair Classification

Welfare and Distributional Impacts of Fair Classification. Yiling Chen, 2018, Paper, “Current methodologies in machine learning analyze the effects of various statistical parity notions of fairness primarily in light of their impacts on predictive accuracy and vendor utility loss. In this paper, we propose a new framework for interpreting the effects of fairness criteria by converting the constrained loss minimization problem into a social welfare maximization problem.Link

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Immigration and Redistribution

Immigration and Redistribution. Alberto Alesina, June 2018, Paper, “We design and conduct large-scale surveys and experiments in six countries to investigate how natives’ perceptions of immigrants influence their preferences for redistribution. We find strikingly large biases in natives’ perceptions of the number and characteristics of immigrants: in all countries, respondents greatly overestimate the total number of immigrants, think immigrants are culturally and religiously more distant from them, and are economically weaker – less educated, more unemployed, poorer, and more reliant on government transfers – than is the case.Link

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