Found 621 article(s) in category 'Inequality'

Why a Universal Basic Income Is Better Than Subsidies of Low-Wage Work

Why a Universal Basic Income Is Better Than Subsidies of Low-Wage Work. Maximilian Kasy, August 5, 2018, Paper, “In this paper, we compare subsidies of low-wage work, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), to unconditional cash transfers—or what is commonly referred to as a universal basic income (UBI).2 The EITC helps families with low earnings but does not provide any support to those without earnings. It is an extremely popular policy because it redistributes income to low-earning families while encouraging work. In contrast, a UBI provides unconditional support to everyone and is often combined with a progressive tax on earnings.Link

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The real reason you’re not getting a pay raise

The real reason you’re not getting a pay raise. Jason Furman, July 31, 2018, Opinion, “Wages are growing much more slowly than the last time we had sustained low unemployment rates, the late 1990s. This is the notorious “wage puzzle,” a topic that has been the subject of much speculation by everyone from Federal Reserve Chair Jay Powell to pretty much every economist I follow on Twitter.Link

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Misperceptions about immigration and support for redistribution

Misperceptions about immigration and support for redistribution. Alberto Alesina, July 31, 2018, Paper, “The debate on immigration is often based on misperceptions about the number and character of immigrants. The column uses data from surveys in six countries to show that such misperceptions are striking and widespread. The column also describes how an experiment in which people were encouraged think about their perception of immigrants made them more averse to redistribution in general, suggesting that the focus on immigration in the political debate – without correcting the misperceptions respondents have about immigrants – could have the unintended consequence of reducing support for redistribution.Link

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Poverty in America: New Directions and Debates

Poverty in America: New Directions and Debates. Matthew Desmond, Bruce Western, July 2018, Paper, “Reviewing recent research on poverty in the United States, we derive a conceptual framework with three main characteristics. First, poverty is multidimensional, compounding material hardship with human frailty, generational trauma, family and neighborhood violence, and broken institutions. Second, poverty is relational, produced through connections between the truly advantaged and the truly disadvantaged. Third, a component of this conceptual framework is transparently normative, applying empirical research to analyze poverty as a matter of justice, not just economics. Throughout, we discuss conceptual, methodological, and policy-relevant implications of this perspective on the study of extreme disadvantage in America.Link

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Globalization and Inequality

Globalization and Inequality. Elhanan Helpman, 2018, Book, “Globalization is not the primary cause of rising inequality. This may come as a surprise. Inequality within nations has risen steadily in recent decades, at a time when countries around the world have eased restrictions on the movement of goods, capital, and labor. Many assume a causal relationship, which has motivated opposition to policies that promote freer trade. Elhanan Helpman shows, however, in this timely study that this assumption about the effects of globalization is more myth than fact.Link

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Development Ethics as Reflected in the Right to Development

Development Ethics as Reflected in the Right to Development. Stephen Marks, 2018, Book Chapter, “One of the most salient contradictions of human rights in international development is the fact that there exists a human rights instrument that directly addresses all agreedupon ethical principles of development, as defined in this handbook (See Chapter 1 above.) and yet implementation of that instrument is mired in “political theatre” and consequently is inoperable. Indeed, the Declaration on the Right to Development (DRTD), which was adopted by UN General Assembly (GA) on 4 December 1986 (UN 1986), addresses directly all seven values analyzed by this handbook and efforts to clarify the meaning of its ten articles through expert inputs provided to the United Nations have been even more explicit on these ethical principles.Link

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Alberto Alesina on Inequality, Immigration, and Austerity

Alberto Alesina on Inequality, Immigration, and Austerity July 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Alberto Alesina, the Nathaniel Ropes Professor of Political Economy at Harvard University, on inequality, immigration, and austerity. | Click here for more interviews like this one. Links: Alberto Alesina’s faculty page at Harvard | Publications | NBER research page | Wikipedia Growthpolicy.org. […]

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Implementation Ups and Downs: Monitoring Attendance to Improve Public Services for the Poor in India

Implementation Ups and Downs: Monitoring Attendance to Improve Public Services for the Poor in India. Rema Hanna, July 14, 2018, Paper, “High levels of absenteeism among health workers and teachers have negative effects on citizen health and human capital development. An attendance-monitoring intervention in schools reduced absenteeism and improved test scores, but the impact on health care workers was limited.Link

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