Found 466 article(s) in category 'Q3: Inequality?'

The Future of Economic and Social Rights – Foreword

The Future of Economic and Social Rights – Foreword. Amartya Sen, 2019, Book Chapter, “The future of economic and social rights is unlikely to resemble its past. Neglected within the human rights movement, avoided by courts, and subsumed within a single-minded conception of development as economic growth, economic and social rights enjoyed an uncertain status in international human rights law and in the public laws of most countries. However, today, under conditions of immense poverty, insecurity, and political instability, the rights to education, health care, housing, social security, food, water, and sanitation are central components of the human rights agenda. The Future of Economic and Social Rights captures the significant transformations occurring in the theory and practice of economic and social rights, in constitutional and human rights law. Professor Katharine G. Young brings together a group of distinguished scholars from diverse disciplines to examine and advance the broad research field of economic and social rights that incorporates legal, political science, economic, philosophy and anthropology scholars.Link

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Do the Poor Pay More for Housing? Exploitation, Profit, and Risk in Rental Markets

Do the Poor Pay More for Housing? Exploitation, Profit, and Risk in Rental Markets. Matthew Desmond, 2019, Paper, “This article examines tenant exploitation and landlord profit margins within residential rental markets. Defining exploitation as being overcharged relative to the market value of a property, the authors find exploitation of tenants to be highest in poor neighborhoods. Landlords in poor neighborhoods also extract higher profits from housing units. Property values and tax burdens are considerably lower in depressed residential areas, but rents are not. Because landlords operating in poor communities face more risks, they hedge their position by raising rents on all tenants, carrying the weight of social structure into price. Since losses are rare, landlords typically realize the surplus risk charge as higher profits. Promoting a relational approach to the analysis of inequality, this study demonstrates how the market strategies of landlords contribute to high rent burdens in low-income neighborhoods.Link

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The globalisation of constitutional law as a weakly neo-liberal project

The globalisation of constitutional law as a weakly neo-liberal project. Mark Tushnet, March 7, 2019, Paper, “An international consensus on the content of domestic constitutional law has structural ‘rights’-related components. The former requires roughly democratic systems for choosing representatives/executives. The consensus favours some forms of judicialised constitutional review, though the precise form is open to choice. The rights component includes a standard list of ‘core’ civil rights, including in this category equality along a number of dimensions – though not class or income. The rights-component is fundamentally neo-liberal. This is clearest in connection with ‘second generation’ social and economic rights, which – the consensus holds – can be recognised in a constitution but should not be vigorously enforceable (in systems where there is judicial enforcement of constitutional rights). The rights of free expression and political association must be specified in ways that allow political challenges to be mounted against efforts – including legislative programmes of political parties that control governments – to resist the neo-liberal policy agenda.Link

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Unequal Europe: Regional Integration and the Rise of European Inequality

Unequal Europe: Regional Integration and the Rise of European Inequality. Jason Beckfield, 2019, Book, “Argues that European integration causes the convergence and retrenchment of European welfare states. Shows that regional integration has important effects on European welfare states and income inequality in Europe over and above those of globalization. Develops the concept of “technocratic capitalism” as an interpretation of a predominant form of capitalism in the EU over the last thirty years.Link

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Immigration and Preferences for Redistribution in Europe

Immigration and Preferences for Redistribution in Europe. Alberto Alesina, February 2019, Paper, “We examine the relationship between immigration and attitudes toward redistribution using a newly assembled data set of immigrant stocks for 140 regions of 16 Western European countries. Exploiting within-country variations in the share of immigrants at the regional level, we find that native respondents display lower support for redistribution when the share of immigrants in their residence region is higher. This negative association is driven by regions of countries with relatively large Welfare States and by respondents at the center or at the right of the political spectrum. The effects are also stronger when immigrants originate from Middle-Eastern countries, are less skilled than natives, and experience more residential segregation. These results are unlikely to be driven by immigrants’ endogenous location choices.Link

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Jeremy Stein on income inequality, monetary policy and the bond market, and preventing the next financial crisis

Jeremy Stein on income inequality, monetary policy and the bond market, and preventing the next financial crisis February 2019. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Jeremy Stein, the Moise Y. Safra Professor of Economics and Chairman of the Department of Economics at Harvard University, on income inequality, monetary policy and the bond market, and preventing the next […]

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Economic Strategy for Higher Wages and Expanded Labor Participation

Economic Strategy for Higher Wages and Expanded Labor Participation. Jason Furman, Martin Feldstein, 2019, Paper, “We propose two alternative policy options for promoting increased earnings and employment of low-income households: expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) among childless workers, and implementing a wage subsidy for low-income workers that would be administered through employers. The EITC is based on household income and administered as a tax credit, while the subsidy based on hourly wages would require no filing or administrative effort by workers. We compare and contrast the costs and benefits of these two approaches to raising wages. Our two policy options are meant as part of a response to the sluggish income growth at the bottom of the distribution over the past several decades.Link

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