Found 382 article(s) in category 'Q2: Inequality?'

WHAT SHOULD WE DO ABOUT INEQUALITY?

Inequality has been rising both within and between countries in recent years. The posts collected here define the different dimensions of inequality and how they manifest, examine its causes, and discuss the extent to which we should be worried. In addition to diagnosing the problem, the posts offer policy options to address it.

Alberto Alesina on Inequality, Immigration, and Austerity

Alberto Alesina on Inequality, Immigration, and Austerity July 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Alberto Alesina, the Nathaniel Ropes Professor of Political Economy at Harvard University, on inequality, immigration, and austerity. | Click here for more interviews like this one. Links: Alberto Alesina’s faculty page at Harvard | Publications | NBER research page | Wikipedia Growthpolicy.org. […]

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Good Credit and the Good Life: Credit Scores Predict Subjective Well-Being

Good Credit and the Good Life: Credit Scores Predict Subjective Well-Being. Ashley Whillans, 2018, Paper, “Can money buy happiness? To examine this question, research in economics, psychology, and sociology has focused almost exclusively on examining the associations between income,
spending or wealth and subjective well-being. Moving beyond this research, we provide the first empirical evidence that credit scores uniquely predict happiness. Across two samples, from the United Kingdom (N=615) and the United States (N=768), credit scores predicted life satisfaction even after controlling for a range of financial covariates, including income, spending, savings, debt, and home-ownership. Respondents with higher credit scores felt more optimistic about their future, promoting happiness.Link

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Global Markets and Inequality in African Countries

Global Markets and Inequality in African Countries. Eric Maskin, 2018, Paper, “Globalization has had a big impact on many African countries in the last 20 years. It has provided a considerably expanded market for their exports; allowed them to specialize more in products for which they have a comparative advantage; and given their consumers access to an array of goods that they would not otherwise enjoy. In addition, it has led to impressive GDP growth in much of Africa, and has been an important force for improving average prosperity.Link

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Ed Glaeser on the Future of Employment, Inequality, Poverty, and Joblessness in America

Ed Glaeser on the Future of Employment, Inequality, Poverty, and Joblessness in America July 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Ed Glaeser, the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard University, on the future of employment, inequality, poverty, and joblessness in America. | Click here for more interviews like this one. Links: Ed Glaeser’s […]

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Welfare and Distributional Impacts of Fair Classification

Welfare and Distributional Impacts of Fair Classification. Yiling Chen, 2018, Paper, “Current methodologies in machine learning analyze the effects of various statistical parity notions of fairness primarily in light of their impacts on predictive accuracy and vendor utility loss. In this paper, we propose a new framework for interpreting the effects of fairness criteria by converting the constrained loss minimization problem into a social welfare maximization problem.Link

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Immigration and Redistribution

Immigration and Redistribution. Alberto Alesina, June 2018, Paper, “We design and conduct large-scale surveys and experiments in six countries to investigate how natives’ perceptions of immigrants influence their preferences for redistribution. We find strikingly large biases in natives’ perceptions of the number and characteristics of immigrants: in all countries, respondents greatly overestimate the total number of immigrants, think immigrants are culturally and religiously more distant from them, and are economically weaker – less educated, more unemployed, poorer, and more reliant on government transfers – than is the case.Link

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The State of the Nation’s Housing 2018

The State of the Nation’s Housing 2018. Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies, June 28, 2018, Paper, “As we mark the 30th anniversary of the State of the Nation’s Housing series, this year’s report presents an opportunity to reflect on how housing market conditions in the United States have evolved over the decades. In addition to our usual look at current trends, the analysis examines how some of today’s conditions echo the past and are a yardstick for the progress we as a nation have and have not made in fulfilling the promise of a decent, affordable home for all.Link

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Slower Productivity and Higher Inequality: Are They Related?

Slower Productivity and Higher Inequality: Are They Related? Jason Furman, June 2018, Paper, “Income growth for typical American families has slowed dramatically since 1973. Slower productivity growth and an increase in income inequality have both contributed to this trend. This paper addresses whether there is a relationship between the productivity slowdown and the increase in inequality, specifically exploring the extent to which reduced competition and dynamism can explain both of these phenomena. Productivity growth has been uneven across the economy, with top firms earning increasingly skewed returns. At the same time, the between-firm disparities have been important in explaining the increase in labor income inequality.Link

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