Found 362 article(s) in category 'Q2: Inequality?'

WHAT SHOULD WE DO ABOUT INEQUALITY?

Inequality has been rising both within and between countries in recent years. The posts collected here define the different dimensions of inequality and how they manifest, examine its causes, and discuss the extent to which we should be worried. In addition to diagnosing the problem, the posts offer policy options to address it.

Venezuela Has a Refugee Crisis Of Syrian Magnitudes

Venezuela Has a Refugee Crisis Of Syrian Magnitudes. Ricardo Hausmann, May 21, 2018, Audio, “Ricardo Hausmann, Harvard economist and Former Minister of Planning for Venezuela, discusses Venezuela’s elections and economic outlook.Alan Bjerga, agriculture reporter for Bloomberg, on how the agriculture sector is hurting from GOP policies on trade, NAFTA, and the rejection of farm legislation in the House.Travis Briggs, CEO of ROBO Global, on investing in robotics, automation and AI. Brooke Sutherland, Industrials and Deals columnist for Bloomberg Opinion, on GE merging its century-old locomotive business with Wabtec Corp. in a deal valued at $11.1 billion.Link

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Redistribution Without a Median Voter: Models of Multidimensional Politics

Redistribution Without a Median Voter: Models of Multidimensional Politics. Torben Iversen, May 2018, Paper, “Most work on redistribution in democracies is anchored in long-standing unidimensional models, notably the seminal Meltzer-Richard-Romer model. When scholars venture outside the security of unidimensionality, many either abandon theoretical rigor or miss the full consequences of adding more dimensions (whether ideological or economic). There is now a substantial literature on redistributive politics in multidimensional policy spaces, but it tends to be very technical and frequently misinterpreted, if not ignored. This purpose of this article is to review this relatively new literature using simple graphical representations,Link

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Bloomberg Opinion Radio: Weekend Edition

Bloomberg Opinion Radio: Weekend Edition. Noah Feldman, May 18, 2018, Audio, “Bloomberg Opinion Weekend Edition hosted by June Grasso. Guests: Max Nisen, Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “Look in the Mirror for a Reason Drug Prices Are High.” Noah Feldman, Harvard Law School professor and Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “Sports Betting Is a Victory for States’ Rights.” Liam Denning, Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “California Puts Solar on the Roof and Up For Grabs.” Joe Nocera, Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “How Tom Wolfe’s Perspective Changed Magazines.” Mary Duenwald, Bloomberg Opinion editor: “Tax Sugar-Sweetened Drinks to Help Fight Obesity.” Link

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What happens when investments targeting women’s microbusinesses go to men?

What happens when investments targeting women’s microbusinesses go to men? Rohini Pande, May 2, 2018, Paper, “Several studies find that male-operated – but not female-operated – microenterprises benefit from access to grants or loans. But these analyses overlook that female entrepreneurs often reside with a male business owner. Using data from randomized trials in India, Sri Lanka and Ghana, this paper finds that household-level income gains are equivalent regardless of the grant or loan recipient’s gender. Low average returns of female-run enterprises reflects the fact that women’s capital is typically invested into their husband’s enterprise.Link

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Kenneth Rogoff on Growth, Inequality, Financial Crises, and the Future of Money

Kenneth Rogoff on Growth, Inequality, Financial Crises, and the Future of Money April 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Kenneth Rogoff, Professor of Economics and Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University on Growth, Inequality, Financial Crises, and the Future of Money. | Click here for more interviews like this one. Links: Kenneth Rogoff’s […]

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Addressing Recognition Gaps: Destigmatization and the Reduction of Inequality

Addressing Recognition Gaps: Destigmatization and the Reduction of Inequality. Michèle Lamont, June 2018, Paper, “This Presidential Address offers elements for a systematic and cumulative study of destigmatization, or the process by which low-status groups gain recognition and worth. Contemporary sociologists tend to focus on inequality in the distribution of resources, such as occupation, education, and wealth. Complementing this research, this address draws attention to “recognition gaps,” defined as disparities in worth and cultural membership between groups in a society. Drawing on research I have conducted, I first describe how neoliberalism promotes growing recognition gaps. Then, drawing on research on stigmatized groups across several societies,Link

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For Richer: The Effects of Marriage on Wealth Accumulation

For Richer: The Effects of Marriage on Wealth Accumulation. Alexandra Killewald, 2018, Paper, “Marriage is widely considered to benefit individuals’ economic well-being, including their net worth. Yet establishing the role of marriage in wealth generation is complicated by the dynamic and reciprocal nature of marriage and wealth: marriage is both the result of prior wealth and a potential determinant of future wealth. We use data from the NLSY79 and marginal structural models that account for these dynamic selection processes to estimate the effect marital histories on midlife wealth.Link

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Race and Economic Opportunity in the United States: An Intergenerational Perspective

Race and Economic Opportunity in the United States: An Intergenerational Perspective. Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, March 2018, Paper, “We study the sources of racial and ethnic disparities in income using de-identified longitudinal data covering nearly the entire U.S. population from 1989-2015. We document three sets of results. First, the intergenerational persistence of disparities varies substantially across racial groups. For example, Hispanic Americans are moving up significantly in the income distribution across generations because they have relatively high rates of intergenerational income mobility. In contrast, black Americans have substantially lower rates of upward mobility and higher rates of downward mobility than whites, leading to large income disparities that persist across generations.Link

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Populism, Liberalism, and Democracy

Populism, Liberalism, and Democracy. Michael Sandel, March 13, 2018, Paper, “The right-wing populism ascendant today is a symptom of the failure of progressive politics. Central to this failure is the uncritical embrace of a neo-liberal version of globalization that benefits those at the top but leaves ordinary citizens feeling disempowered. Progressive parties are unlikely to win back public support unless they learn from the populist protest that has displaced them —not by replicating its xenophobia and strident nationalism, but by taking seriously the legitimate grievances with which these ugly sentiments are entangled. These grievances are not only economic but also moral and cultural; they are not only about wages and jobs but also about social esteem.Link

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