Found 3 article(s) for author 'WTO'

Trade and Agricultural Disease: Import Restrictions in the Wake of the India – Agricultural Products Dispute

Trade and Agricultural Disease: Import Restrictions in the Wake of the India – Agricultural Products Dispute. Mark Wu, December 14, 2016, Paper, “Trade in agricultural products raises sensitivities, particularly when imports originate from a trading partner experiencing an outbreak of some type of agricultural disease. In this article, we explain why despite the negative externalities associated with diseased imports, an importing country is generally not permitted to ban such imports outright under WTO law. Rather, it is allowed to do so only under fairly specific circumstances. We also highlight how the recent India – Agricultural Products ruling contributes to the jurisprudence of two issues concerning the SPS Agreement: the interpretation of international standards, and the relationship between the risk assessment and scientific evidence requirements.Link

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Don’t Cry Over Dead Trade Agreements

Don’t Cry Over Dead Trade Agreements. Dani Rodrik, December 8, 2016, Opinion, “The seven decades since the end of World War II were an era of trade agreements. The world’s major economies were in a perpetual state of trade negotiations, concluding two major global multilateral deals: the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the treaty establishing the World Trade Organization. In addition, more than 500 bilateral and regional trade agreements were signed – the vast majority of them since the WTO replaced the GATT in 1995.Link

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What the WTO can learn from Paris climate talks

What the WTO can learn from Paris climate talks. Robert Lawrence, December 7, 2015, Opinion. “For many years, negotiators at the annual conferences of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change looked longingly at how the World Trade Organization was able to negotiate effective international agreements. Ironically, the Paris climate talks that are scheduled to conclude on Friday and the WTO negotiations, which will take place next week in Nairobi, lead to the opposite conclusion. Trade negotiators should emulate the progress made in the climate change agreements by moving away from a simplistic division between developed and developing countries. For years, global climate change policy was hobbled by this division. In the Kyoto Protocol — the international agreement to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions — only developed countries committed to mandatory emissions reduction. Developing countries had no obligations. … Link

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