Found 3 article(s) for author 'World Economy'

The World Economy Growth or Stagnation?

The World Economy Growth or Stagnation? Dale Jorgenson, November 2016, Book, “The balance of the world economy is shifting away from the established economies of Europe, Japan, and the USA, towards the emerging economies of Asia, especially India and China. With contributions from some of the world’s leading growth theorists, this book analyses the long-term process of structural change and productivity growth across the world from a unique comparative perspective. Ongoing research from the World KLEMS Initiative is used to comparatively study new sources of growth – including the role of investment in intangible assets, human capital, technology catch-up, and trade in global value chains. This book provides comparisons of industries and economies that are key to analysing the impacts of international trade and investment. This makes it an ideal read for academics and students interested in understanding current patterns of economic growth. It will also be of value to professionals with an interest in the drivers of economic growth and crisis.” Link

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The emergence of the new economic order: Growth in the G7 and the G20

The emergence of the new economic order: Growth in the G7 and the G20. Dale Jorgenson, May 2013, Paper. “The massive reconfiguration of the world economy over the next decade will lead to a New Economic Order by 2020. China will displace the U.S. as the world’s leading economy and India will overtake Japan. This will shift the balance of the G20 from the leading industrialized economies of the G7 to the emerging economies, especially China and India. The rise of the Asian model of economic growth will underscore the importance of globalization and…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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The Globalization Paradox – Democracy and the Future of the World Economy

The Globalization Paradox – Democracy and the Future of the World Economy. Dani Rodrik, February 2011, Book. “Surveying three centuries of economic history, a Harvard professor argues for a leaner global system that puts national democracies front and center. From the mercantile monopolies of seventeenth-century empires to the modern-day authority of the WTO, IMF, and World Bank, the nations of the world have struggled to effectively harness globalization’s promise. The economic narratives that underpinned these eras—the gold standard, the Bretton Woods regime, the “Washington Consensus”—brought great success and great failure…” May require purchase or user account. Link Verified October 29, 2014

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