Found 5 article(s) for author 'tax reform'

Trump Hopes To Lure Companies Back To The U.S. With Lower Tax Rates

Trump Hopes To Lure Companies Back To The U.S. With Lower Tax Rates. C. Fritz Foley, May 29, 2017, Audio, “A key part of President Trump’s tax plan is to repatriate corporate profits held overseas back to the U.S. With the lure of lower corporate rates, the idea is that companies will free up overseas earnings and instead invest in jobs and equipment in the U.S. A similar scheme was tried during the administration of George W. Bush, but companies used most of the money on stock buybacks or to pay dividends to shareholders.Link

Tags: , , , ,

No Idea What Trump Means by Reciprocal Tax

No Idea What Trump Means by Reciprocal Tax. Martin Feldstein, May 3, 2017, Video, “Martin Feldstein, professor of economics at Harvard University, discusses his thoughts on tax policy and the Trump administration. He speaks with Bloomberg’s David Westin and Jonathan Ferro on “Bloomberg Daybreak: Americas.” (Source: Bloomberg)” Two Parts –  Link  1 “Reciprocal Tax” Link 2 – “Big Issue is Tax Reform

Tags: , , , , , ,

The Debate on Corporate Tax Reform Just Started for Real

The Debate on Corporate Tax Reform Just Started for Real. Mihir Desai, May 2017, Opinion, “President Trump’s announcement of his proposed tax reforms, as skeletal as it was, is better news than most commentators have suggested. First, it signals that the administration is coming to the view that tax reform is the most important agenda item for the first term — and that is great news. Second, the fact that the corporate piece of the proposal did not embrace the plan proposed by House Ways and Means Chair Kevin Brady and Speaker Paul Ryan, and its so-called border adjustment tax, is also good news. So, there is some good news in what it signals and what’s not in it. What about what is in it?Link

Tags: , , ,

Getting From Here to There: The Transition Tax Issue

Getting From Here to There: The Transition Tax Issue. Stephen Shay, March 27, 2017, Paper, “If there is fundamental U.S. international income tax reform, regardless of the reform option chosen, the United States must decide how to handle the $2.4 trillion to $2.6 trillion of previously untaxed foreign income accumulated by U.S. multinational corporations. In this report, Fleming, Peroni, and Shay argue that the proper approach is to treat the income as a subpart F inclusion in the year before the effective date of fundamental reform and to tax it at regular rates with an option to make the payments in installments that bear market-rate interest. The authors explain why the case for a low or deferred tax on this income is inferior to the case for full immediate taxation.Link

Tags: , , , , ,