Found 6 article(s) for author 'Social Policy'

Virtual, Visible, and Actionable: Data assemblages and the sightlines of justice

Virtual, Visible, and Actionable: Data assemblages and the sightlines of justice. Sheila Jasanoff, August 16, 2017, Paper, “This paper explores the politics of representing events in the world in the form of data points, data sets, or data associations. Data collection involves an act of seeing and recording something that was previously hidden and possibly unnamed. The incidences included in a data set are not random or unrelated but stand for coherent, classifiable phenomena in the world. Moreover, for data to have an impact on law and policy, such information must be seen as actionable, that is, the aggregated data must show people both something they can perceive and something that demands interrogation, explanation, or resolution. Actionable data problematize the taken-for-granted order of society by pointing to questions or imbalances that can be corrected or rectified, or simply better understood, through systematic compilations of occurrences, frequencies, distributions, or correlations.Link

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(Mis)perceptions of Inequality

(Mis)perceptions of Inequality. Michael I. Norton, July 24, 2017, Paper, “Laypeople’s beliefs about the current distribution of outcomes such as income and wealth in their country influence their attitudes towards issues ranging from taxation to healthcare–but how accurate are these beliefs? We review the burgeoning literature on (mis)perceptions of inequality. First, we show that people on average misperceive current levels of inequality, typically underestimating the extent of inequality in their country. Second, we delineate potential causes of these misperceptions, including people’s overreliance on cues from their local environment, leading to their erroneous beliefs about both the overall distributions of wealth and income and their place in those distributions. Third, we document that these (mis)perceptions of inequality—but not actual levels of inequality—drive behavior and preferences for redistribution. More promisingly, we review research suggesting that correcting misperceptions influences preferences and policy outcomes.Link

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How Social Policy Contributes to the Distribution of Population Health: The Case of Gender Health Equity

How Social Policy Contributes to the Distribution of Population Health: The Case of Gender Health Equity. Jason Beckfield, July 4, 2017, Paper, “In this study we aimed to analyze gender health equity as a case of how social policy contributes to population health. We analyzed three sets of social-investment policies implemented in Europe and previously hypothesized to reduce gender inequity in labor market outcomes: childcare; active labor market programs; and long-term care. Methods: We use 12 indicators of social-investment policies from the OECD Social Expenditure Database, the OECD Family Database, and the Social Policy Indicators’ Parental Leave Benefit Dataset.Link

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Reducing Inequality and Poverty in America

Reducing Inequality and Poverty in America. Martin Feldstein, August 23, 2016, Opinion, “With a new American president and Congress taking office just six months from now, the time has come to rethink the government’s programs aimed at helping the poor. The current election season has reflected widespread concern about the issue of inequality. Reducing poverty, rather than penalizing earned success, is the right focus for dealing with it.” Link

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Productivity and Selection of Human Capital with Machine Learning

Productivity and Selection of Human Capital with Machine Learning. Michael Luca, Sendhil Mullainathan, 2016, Paper. “Economists have become increasingly interested in studying the nature of production functions in social policy applications, Y = f(L, K), with the goal of improving productivity. For example what is the effect on student learning from hiring an additional teacher, ∂Y/∂L, in theory (Lazear, 2001) or in practice (Krueger, 2003)? What is the effect of hiring one more police officer (Levitt, 1997)?Link

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David Laibson: Behavioural Economics and Public Policy Design (Parts 1 & 2 – Civil Service College, Singapore)

David Laibson: Behavioural Economics and Public Policy Design (Parts 1 & 2 – Civil Service College, Singapore). David Laibson, July 30, 2013, Video. “Professor David Laibson discusses how behavioural economics (BE) has helped policymakers design policy interventions that are more effective and behaviourally compatible. Using examples from Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs), Professor Laibson illustrates how this rigorous tool can be used to estimate the net effects and impact of policy interventions and help establish the cause and effect of policy interventions and outcomes. RCTs can further…” Link verified August 21, 2014

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