Found 7 article(s) for author 'Michael Norton'

When Novel Rituals Impact Intergroup Bias: Evidence from Economic Games and Neurophysiology

When Novel Rituals Impact Intergroup Bias: Evidence from Economic Games and Neurophysiology. Francesca Gino, Michael Norton, January 17, 2017, Paper, “Long-established rituals in pre-existing cultural groups have been linked to the cultural evolution of group cooperation. Here we test the prediction that novel rituals – arbitrary hand and body gestures enacted in a stereotypical and repeated fashion – can impact intergroup bias in newly formed groups. In four studies, participants practiced novel rituals at home for one week (Experiments 1, 2, 4) or once in the lab (pre-registered Experiment 3), and were divided into minimal ingroups and outgroups. Our results offer mixed support for the hypothesis that novel rituals promote intergroup bias. A modest effect for daily repeated rituals but a null effect for rituals enacted only once suggests that novel rituals can inculcate bias, but only when certain features are present: rituals must be sufficiently elaborate and repeated to impact bias. Taken together, our results offer modest support for the influence of novel rituals on intergroup bias.Link

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Time, Money, and Happiness

Time, Money, and Happiness. Michael Norton, August 2016, Paper, “We highlight recent research examining how people should manage their most precious resources — time and money — to maximize their happiness. Contrary to people’s intuitions, happiness may be less contingent on the sheer amount of each resource available and more on how people both think about and choose to spend them. Overall, focusing on time leads to greater happiness than focusing on money. Moreover, people enjoy greater happiness from spending money on others rather than themselves and from acquiring experiences instead of possessions. Similarly, people enjoy greater happiness from spending time on or with others and from acquiring experiences — both extraordinary and ordinary.Link

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The Challenge of Shared Prosperity

The Challenge of Shared Prosperity. Jan Rivkin, Karen Mills, Michael E. Porter, Michael I. Norton, Mitchell Weiss, September 2015, Paper. “In the 2015 survey on U.S. competitiveness, HBS alumni weigh in on the current state and future trajectory of U.S. competitiveness as well as the structural strengths and weaknesses of the U.S. business environment. In addition, alumni delve deeper into two aspects of competitiveness: the health of entrepreneurship in the U.S. and business leaders’ views on shared prosperity. Alumni are optimistic about the ability of U.S. firms to compete globally and they see entrepreneurship as more accessible today than it was a decade ago…Link

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The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Psychology

The Cambridge Handbook of Consumer Psychology. Michael I. Norton, 2015, Book, “Why do consumers make the purchases they do, and which ones make them truly happy? Why are consumers willing to spend huge sums of money to appear high status? This handbook addresses these key questions and many more. Link

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How Elastic Are Preferences for Redistribution? Evidence from Randomized Survey Experiments

How Elastic Are Preferences for Redistribution? Evidence from Randomized Survey Experiments. Michael I. Norton, April 2015, Paper. “We analyze randomized online survey experiments providing interactive, customized information on US income inequality, the link between top income tax rates and economic growth, and the estate tax. The treatment has large effects on views about inequality but only slightly moves tax and transfer policy preferences. An exception is the estate tax–informing respondents of the small share of decedents who pay it doubles support for it. The small effects for all other policies can be partially explained by respondents’ low trust in government and a disconnect between concerns about social issues and the public policies meant to address them.” Link

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The Asymmetric Experience of Positive and Negative Economic Growth: Global Evidence Using Subjective Well-Being Data

The Asymmetric Experience of Positive and Negative Economic Growth: Global Evidence Using Subjective Well-Being Data. Michael I. Norton, March 2015, Paper. “Are individuals more sensitive to losses than gains in macroeconomic growth? Using subjective well-being measures across three large data sets, we observe an asymmetry in the way positive and negative economic growth are experienced, with losses having more than twice as much impact on individual happiness as compared to equivalent gains. We use Gallup World Poll data drawn from 151 countries, BRFSS data taken from a representative sample of 2.5 million…Link

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The Not-So-Common-Wealth of Australia: Evidence for a Cross-Cultural Desire for a More Equal Distribution of Wealth

The Not-So-Common-Wealth of Australia: Evidence for a Cross-Cultural Desire for a More Equal Distribution of Wealth. Michael I. Norton, 2014, Paper. “Recent evidence suggests that Americans underestimate wealth inequality in the United States and favor a more equal wealth distribution (Norton & Ariely, 2011). Does this pattern reflect ideological dynamics unique to the United States, or is the phenomenon evident in other developed economies—such as Australia? We assessed Australians’ perceived and ideal wealth distributions and compared them to the actual wealth distribution. Although the United States and Australia…Link

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