Found 32 article(s) for author 'Lawrence Katz'

The Cost of Workplace Flexibility for High-Powered Professionals

The Cost of Workplace Flexibility for High-Powered Professionals. Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, November 2011, Paper. “We study the pecuniary penalties for family-related amenities in the workplace (e.g., job interruptions, short hours, part-time work, and flexibility during the workday), how women have responded to them, and how the penalties have changed over time. The pecuniary penalties to behaviors that are beneficial to family appear to have decreased in many professions. Self-employment has declined in many of the high-end professions (e.g., pharmacy, optometry, dental, law, medicine, and veterinary medicine) where it was…” Link

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Neighborhoods, Obesity and Diabetes – A Randomized Social Experiment

Neighborhoods, Obesity and Diabetes – A Randomized Social Experiment. Lawrence Katz, Ronald Kessler, October 20, 2011, Paper. “Using data from a large social experiment (Moving to Opportunity), which offered low-income women the chance to move from high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhoods, this study estimates the association of the randomized intervention with obesity and diabetes.” Link

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Mass Secondary Schooling and the State: The Role of State Compulsion in the High School Movement

Mass Secondary Schooling and the State: The Role of State Compulsion in the High School Movement. Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, August 2011, Book Chapter. “From 1910 to 1940, a period known in U.S. educational history as the high school movement, the fraction of youths enrolled in public and private U.S.
secondary schools increased from 18 to 71 percent. The fraction graduating nationwide soared from 9 to 51 percent and the increase was even greater in most northern and western states. Such increases are as large as those achieved in the recent histories of nations undergoing the most rapid of transitions to mass secondary schooling. In South Korea, for example, the fraction…”
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Grand Challenges in the Study of Employment and Technological Change

Grand Challenges in the Study of Employment and Technological Change. Lawrence Katz, September 29, 2010, Paper. “Leading economists from Paul Samuelson to Paul Krugman have labored to allay the fear that technological advances may reduce overall employment, causing mass unemployment as workers are displaced by machines. This ‘lump of labor fallacy’ – positing that there is a fixed amount of work to be done so that increased labor productivity reduces employment – is intuitively appealing and demonstrably false. Technological improvements create new products and services…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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Putting the Co in Education: Timing, Reasons, and Consequences of College Coeducation from 1835 to the Present

Putting the Co in Education: Timing, Reasons, and Consequences of College Coeducation from 1835 to the Present. Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, August 2010, Paper. “The history of coeducation in U.S. higher education is explored through an analysis of a database containing information on all institutions offering four-year undergraduate degrees that operated in 1897, 1924, 1934, or 1980, most of which still exist today. These data reveal surprises about the timing of coeducation and the reasons for its increase. Rather than being episodic and caused by financial pressures brought about by wars and recessions, the process of…” Link

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The Future of Inequality: The Other Reason Education Matters So Much

The Future of Inequality: The Other Reason Education Matters So Much, Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, August 22, 2009, Paper. “As almost every economic policy maker is aware, the gap between the wages of educated and less-educated workers has been growing since the early 1980s – and that change has been both large and pervasive even when the measurement is narrowed by gender, industry or occupation. What’s not widely known, though, is that expanding wage inequality is a relatively new phenomenon. In fact, inequality actually narrowed from around 1910 to the 1950s, and then remained fairly stable until the 1980s…” Link 

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Dynamics of the Gender Gap for Young Professionals in the Corporate and Financial Sectors

Dynamics of the Gender Gap for Young Professionals in the Corporate and Financial Sectors. Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, January 2009, Paper. “This paper assesses the relative importance of various explanations for the gender gap in career outcomes for highly-educated workers in the U.S. corporate and financial sectors. The careers of MBAs, who graduated between 1990 and 2006 from a top U.S. business school, are studied to understand how career dynamics differ by gender. Although male and female MBAs have nearly identical (labor) incomes at the outset of their careers, their earnings soon diverge, with the male annual earnings…” Link

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What Can We Learn about Neighborhood Effects from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment?

What Can We Learn about Neighborhood Effects from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment? Lawrence Katz, Jeffrey Liebman, Ronald Kessler, July 2008, Paper. “Experimental estimates from Moving to Opportunity (MTO) show no significant impacts of moves to lower-poverty neighborhoods on adult economic self-sufficiency four to seven years after random assignment. The authors disagree with Clampet-Lundquist and Massey’s claim that MTO was a weak intervention and therefore uninformative about neighborhood effects. MTO produced large changes in neighborhood environments that improved adult…” Link

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Transitions: Career and Family Life Cycles of the Educational Elite

Transitions: Career and Family Life Cycles of the Educational Elite. Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, 2008, Paper. “Among life’s most vital transitions are those concerning family and career. We decide when and whom to marry, how many children to have, whether to further our education, and which occupations and jobs to pursue. Fundamental aspects of these transitions began to change around the early 1970s for the college educated generally, and for women in particular. The median age at first marriage among college graduate women, which had been stable at about 22.5 years old from the 1950s to the early 1970s (for birth cohorts from…” Link

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Long-Run Changes in the U.S. Wage Structure: Narrowing, Widening, Polarizing

Long-Run Changes in the U.S. Wage Structure: Narrowing, Widening, Polarizing. Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, November 2007, Paper. “The U.S. wage structure evolved across the last century: narrowing from 1910 to 1950, fairly stable in the 1950s and 1960s, widening rapidly during the 1980s, and “polarizing” since the late 1980s. We document the spectacular rise of U.S. wage inequality after 1980 and place recent changes into a century-long historical perspective to understand the sources of change. The majority of the increase in wage inequality since 1980 can be accounted for by rising educational wage differentials, just as a…” Link

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