Found 31 article(s) for author 'Lawrence Katz'

America’s Job Challenges and the Continuing Role of the U.S. Department of Labor

America’s Job Challenges and the Continuing Role of the U.S. Department of Labor. Lawrence Katz, March 2013, Paper. “The Great Recession and its aftermath has been a particularly trying period for American workers and their families. Employment collapsed in 2008-9 in the wake of the financial crisis with the unemployment rate more than doubling from 2007 to 2009 and peaking at 10.0 percent in October 2009. Four years into an economic recovery, the unemployment rate remains abnormally high and long-term joblessness a major problem. The employment crisis has exacerbated longer-term U.S. labor market trends of rising…”  Link verified March 28, 2014

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For-Profit Colleges

For-Profit Colleges. David Deming, Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, Spring 2013, Paper. “For-profit, or proprietary, colleges are the fastest-growing postsecondary schools in the nation, enrolling a disproportionately high share of disadvantaged and minority students and those ill-prepared for college. Because these schools, many of them big national chains, derive most of their revenue from taxpayer-funded student financial aid, they are of interest to policy makers not only for the role they play in the higher education spectrum but also for the value they provide their students…” Link Verified October 13, 2014

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Achieving Escape Velocity: Neighborhood and School Interventions to Reduce Persistent Inequality

Achieving Escape Velocity: Neighborhood and School Interventions to Reduce Persistent Inequality. Roland Fryer, Lawrence Katz, 2013, Paper. “This paper reviews the evidence on the efficacy of neighborhood and school interventions in improving the long-run outcomes of children growing up in poor families. We focus on studies exploiting exogenous sources of variation in neighborhoods and schools and which examine at least medium-term outcomes. Higher-quality neighborhoods improve family safety, adult subjective well-being and health, and girls’ mental health. But they have no detectable impact on youth human…”  Link

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Long-Term Neighborhood Effects on Low-Income Families: Evidence from Moving to Opportunity

Long-Term Neighborhood Effects on Low-Income Families: Evidence from Moving to Opportunity. Lawrence Katz, Ronald C. Kessler, 2013, Paper. “We examine long-term neighborhood effects on low-income families using data from the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) randomized housing-mobility experiment. This experiment offered to some public-housing families but not to others the chance to move to less-disadvantaged neighborhoods. We show that ten to 15 years after baseline, MTO: (i) improves adult physical and mental health; (ii) has no detectable effect on economic outcomes or youth schooling or physical health; and (iii) has…”  Link verified March 28, 2014

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Technical Change and the Relative Demand for Skilled Labor: The United States in Historical Perspective

Technical Change and the Relative Demand for Skilled Labor: The United States in Historical Perspective. Lawrence Katz, January 2013, Paper. “This paper examines long-term shifts in the relative demand for skilled labor in the United States. Although de-skilling in the conventional sense did occur overall in nineteenth century manufacturing, a more nuanced picture is that occupations “hollowed out”: the share of “middle-skill” jobs – artisans – declined while those of “high-skill” – white collar, non-production workers – and “low-skill” – operatives and laborers increased…” Link Verified October 13, 2014

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The Most Egalitarian of All Professions: Pharmacy and the Evolution of a Family-Friendly Occupation

The Most Egalitarian of All Professions: Pharmacy and the Evolution of a Family-Friendly Occupation. Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, September 2012, Paper. “Pharmacy has become a female-majority profession that is highly remunerated with a small gender earnings gap and low earnings dispersion relative to other occupations. We sketch a labor market framework based on the theory of equalizing differences to integrate and interpret our empirical findings on earnings, hours of work, and the part-time work wage penalty for pharmacists. Using extensive surveys of pharmacists for…” (May require user account or purchase) Link

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Neighborhood Effects on the Long-Term Well-Being of Low-Income Adults

Neighborhood Effects on the Long-Term Well-Being of Low-Income Adults. Lawrence Katz, Ronald Kessler, July 13, 2012, Paper. “Nearly 9 million Americans live in extreme-poverty neighborhoods, places that also tend to be racially segregated and dangerous. Yet the effects on the well-being of residents of moving out of such communities into less-distressed areas remain uncertain. Using data from Moving to Opportunity, a unique randomized housing mobility experiment, we find that moving from a high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhood leads to long-term (10 to 15 year) improvements in adult physical and mental…” Link

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Notes on Behavioral Economics and Labor Market Policy

Notes on Behavioral Economics and Labor Market Policy. Lawrence Katz, Sendhil Mullainathan, 2012, Paper. “Labor market policies succeed or fail at least in part depending on how well they reflect or account for behavioral responses. Insights from behavioral economics, which allow for realistic deviations from standard economic assumptions about behavior, have consequences for the design and functioning of labor market policies. We review key implications of behavioral economics related to procrastination, difficulties in dealing with complexity, and potentially biased labor market expectations for the design of selected labor market…” Link

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The For-Profit Postsecondary School Sector: Nimble Critters or Agile Predators?

The For-Profit Postsecondary School Sector: Nimble Critters or Agile Predators? David Deming, Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, December 2011, Paper. “Private for-profit institutions have been the fastest growing part of the U.S. higher education sector. For-profit enrollment increased from 0.2 percent to 9.1 percent of total enrollment in degree-granting schools from 1970 to 2009, and for-profit institutions account for the majority of enrollments in non-degree granting postsecondary schools. We describe the schools, students, and programs in the for-profit higher education sector, its phenomenal recent growth, and its relationship to the…” Link

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The Cost of Workplace Flexibility for High-Powered Professionals

The Cost of Workplace Flexibility for High-Powered Professionals. Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, November 2011, Paper. “We study the pecuniary penalties for family-related amenities in the workplace (e.g., job interruptions, short hours, part-time work, and flexibility during the workday), how women have responded to them, and how the penalties have changed over time. The pecuniary penalties to behaviors that are beneficial to family appear to have decreased in many professions. Self-employment has declined in many of the high-end professions (e.g., pharmacy, optometry, dental, law, medicine, and veterinary medicine) where it was…” Link

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