Found 5 article(s) for author 'Knowledge'

Cross-boundary Teaming for Innovation: Integrating Research on Teams and Knowledge in Organizations

Cross-boundary Teaming for Innovation: Integrating Research on Teams and Knowledge in Organizations. Amy Edmondson, 2017, Paper, “Cross-boundary teaming, within and across organizations, is an increasingly popular strategy for innovation. Knowledge diversity is seen to expand the range of views and ideas that teams can draw upon to innovate. Yet, case studies of practice reveal that teaming across knowledge boundaries can be difficult, and innovation is not always realized. Two streams of research are particularly relevant for understanding this challenge: research on team effectiveness and research on knowledge in organizations. They offer complementary insights: the former stream focuses on group dynamics and measures team inputs, processes, emergent states, and outcomes, while the latter closely investigates dialogue and objects in recurrent social practices.Link

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Cross-boundary teaming for innovation: Integrating research on teams and knowledge in organizations

Cross-boundary teaming for innovation: Integrating research on teams and knowledge in organizations. Amy Edmondson, March 2, 2017, Paper, “Cross-boundary teaming, within and across organizations, is an increasingly popular strategy for innovation. Knowledge diversity is seen to expand the range of views and ideas that teams can draw upon to innovate. Yet, case studies reveal that teaming across knowledge boundaries can be difficult in practice, and innovation is not always realized. Two streams of research are particularly relevant for understanding the challenges inherent in cross-boundary teaming: research on team effectiveness and research on knowledge in organizations. They offer complementary insights: the former stream focuses on group dynamics and measures team inputs, processes, emergent states, and outcomes, while the latter closely investigates dialog and objects in recurrent social practices.Link

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Economic Development and the Accumulation of Know-how

Economic Development and the Accumulation of Know-how. Ricardo Hausmann, May 2016, Paper. “Economic development depends on the accumulation of know-how. The theory of economic growth has long emphasised the importance of something called technical progress, but what that is, and how it grows has not been well elucidated. Technical progress is really based on three separate aspects: tools, or embodied knowledge, recipes or blueprints or codified knowledge and know-how or tacit knowledge. While tools can be shipped and codes can be e-mailed, know-how exists only as a particular wiring of the brain and as such it is hard to move around. That is why the growth of know-how can easily become the binding constraint on the development process.Link

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Neighbors and the Evolution of the Comparative Advantage of Nations: Evidence of International Knowledge Diffusion?

Neighbors and the Evolution of the Comparative Advantage of Nations: Evidence of International Knowledge Diffusion? Ricardo Hausmann, August 2013, Paper. “The literature on knowledge diffusion shows that it decays strongly with distance. In this paper we document that the probability that a product is added to a country’s export basket is, on average, 65% larger if a neighboring country is a successful exporter of that same product. For existing products, having a neighbor with comparative advantage in them is associated with a growth of exports that is higher by 1.5 percent per annum. While…” Link verified August 21, 2014

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Neighbors and the Evolution of the Comparative Advantage of Nations: Evidence of International Knowledge Diffusion?

Neighbors and the Evolution of the Comparative Advantage of Nations: Evidence of International Knowledge Diffusion? Ricardo Hausmann, July 26, 2013. “The literature on knowledge diffusion shows that it decays strongly with distance. In this paper we document that the probability that a product is added to a country’s export basket is, on average, 65% larger if a neighboring country is a successful exporter of that same product. For existing products, having a neighbor with comparative advantage in them is associated with a growth of exports that is higher by 1.5 percent per annum. While these results could be driven by a common third factor that escapes our controls, they are what would be expected from the localized character of knowledge diffusion.”  Link

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