Found 3 article(s) for author 'Kenya'

Politics, Academics, and Africa

Politics, Academics, and Africa. Robert Bates, 2017, Paper, “The roots of my fascination with politics and Africa run deep; so too does my need for clarity. The combination drove me into the professoriate. My research in Africa convinced me that modernization theory was wrong: The people I came to know in the field were sophisticated in their politics. Additional research convinced me that market-oriented approaches to political economy were wrong and that government intervention could lead to increases in productivity and welfare. Because neoclassical approaches are flexible, I continue to think in terms of strategy and choice and to apply them to the study of development.Link

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Borrowing Requirements, Credit Access, and Adverse Selection: Evidence from Kenya

Borrowing Requirements, Credit Access, and Adverse Selection: Evidence from Kenya. Michael Kremer, July 18, 2016, Paper, “We examine the potential of asset-collateralized loans in low-income country credit markets. When a Kenyan dairy cooperative exogenously replaced high down payments and joint liability requirements with loans collateralized by the asset itself – a large water tank- loan take-up increased from 2.4% to 41.9%. In contrast, substituting joint liability requirements for deposit requirements had no impact on loan take up. There were no repossessions among farmers allowed to collateralize 75% of their loans, and a 0.7% repossession rate among those offered 96% asset collateralization. A Karlan-Zinman test based on waiving borrowing requirements ex post finds evidence of adverse selection with very low deposit requirements, but not of moral hazard.Link

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The Promise of Microfinance and Women’s Empowerment: What Does the Evidence Say?

The Promise of Microfinance and Women’s Empowerment: What Does the Evidence Say? Dina Pomeranz, February 2014, Paper. “The microfinance revolution has transformed access to financial services for low-income populations worldwide. As a result, it has become one of the most talked-about innovations in global development in recent decades. However, its expansion has not been without controversy. While many hailed it as a way to end world poverty and promote female empowerment, others condemned it as a disaster for the poor…” Link

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