Found 3 article(s) for author 'John Gerard Ruggie'

Multinationals as Global Institution: Power, Authority and Relative Autonomy

Multinationals as Global Institution: Power, Authority and Relative Autonomy. John Gerard Ruggie, June 8, 2017, Paper, “This article aims to inform the long-standing and unresolved debate between voluntary corporate social responsibility and initiatives to impose binding legal obligations on multinational enterprises. The two approaches share a common feature: neither can fully specify its own scope conditions, that is, how much of the people and planet agenda either can expect to deliver. The reason they share this feature is also the same: neither is based on a foundational political analysis of the multinational enterprise in the context of global governance.Link

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Human Rights and the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises: Normative Innovations and Implementation Challenges

Human Rights and the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises: Normative Innovations and Implementation Challenges. John Ruggie, May 3, 2015, Paper. “Business and human rights became an increasingly prominent feature on the international agenda in the 1990s. Global markets widened and deepened significantly as a result of trade liberalization, privatization, deregulation, and off-shoring production as well as financial centers. The rights of multinational corporations to operate globally became legally enshrined in a vast expansion of bilateral investment treaties and investment chapters of bilateral and regional free...” Link

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Just Business: Multinational Corporations and Human Rights

Just Business: Multinational Corporations and Human Rights. John Gerard Ruggie , 2013, Book. “One of the most vexing human rights issues of our time has been how to protect the rights of individuals and communities worldwide in an age of globalization and multinational business. Indeed, from Indonesian sweatshops to oil-based violence in Nigeria, the challenges of regulating harmful corporate practices in some of the world’s most difficult regions long seemed insurmountable. Human rights groups and businesses were locked in a stalemate, unable to find common ground. In 2005, the United Nations…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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