Found 4 article(s) for author 'Jennifer Hochschild'

Race, Class, Politics, and the Disappearance of Work

Race, Class, Politics, and the Disappearance of Work. Jennifer Hochschild, June 5, 2017, Paper, ““When Work Disappears” has shaped research agendas on poverty, racial hierarchy, and urban social and economic dynamics. That is a lot for one article, yet two issues warrant more analysis. They are the ways in which socially defined “race” – rather than or in combination with class – explains the impact of sustained joblessness, and the political behaviours that may emerge in response to work’s disappearance. I point to evidence showing that both race and class have independent associations with the loss of work in poor African-American communities, as well as interactive effects. In the political arena – too often neglected by sociologists studying poverty – sustained, community-wide joblessness or underemployment are associated both with withdrawal from political engagement and with the recent resurgence of right-wing populism. Even after several decades of intensive research, we have more to learn about the interactions of race, class, politics, and the disappearance of work.Link

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“Get your swabs out of my face!” Links between Institutional Context and Public Support for New Technologies

“Get your swabs out of my face!” Links between Institutional Context and Public Support for New Technologies. Jennifer Hochschild, June 6, 2016, Paper. “While not dispositive, public opinion may be especially influential for elected officials on issues about which they have no prior record, views, or expertise. Views on medical and forensic biobanks, therefore, may be important for policy development. Comparison of views between them enable a test of our theory that differing levels of  institutionalization are crucial in shaping public responses to technology; the overall population and politically salient groups have much stronger reactions, both positive and negative, to technologies that are deeply embedded in institutional context than to those with few institutional roots. The evidence comes from a new national survey of about 4000 Americans, with parallel items on medical and forensic DNA databases and almost 4000 open-ended comments explaining respondents’ stances on biobanking.Link

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Redistributive Implications of Open Access

Redistributive Implications of Open Access, Jennifer Hochschild, June 2016, Paper. “This article addresses the virtues of gold open access (OA) from the perspective of its impact on social science scholarly associations and their members. OA has clear and obvious virtues, including redistribution downward and outward of research findings. But it also has the potential for upward redistribution or narrowing of the realm of publication, which this author finds troubling. A central question is who will cover article processing charges. The article identifies five potential sources of the necessary funds or ways to reduce the funds that are necessary, and discusses problems with each in terms of likely gainers and losers. It also identifies two potential substantive concerns about the kinds of social science scholarship most amenable to OA. It concludes by observing that, as is often the case, an apparently narrow technological innovation opens large issues – organizationally, substantively, and even morally.Link

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Race, Racial Inequality, and Biological Determinism in the Genetic and Genomic Era: Biological Dete. rminism and Social Policy: Genetic Determinism, Technology Optimism, and Race: Views of the American Public

Race, Racial Inequality, and Biological Determinism in the Genetic and Genomic Era: Biological Determinism and Social Policy: Genetic Determinism, Technology Optimism, and Race: Views of the American Public. Jennifer Hochschild, September 2015, Paper. “Genomics is already a multi-billion-dollar industry and research program, and it is likely to continue growing exponentially. It enables everything from new dating services and testing the fish in sushi to convictions or exonerations in courts of justice, identifying victims of massacres, and finding cures for devastating rare diseases. It also risks genetic surveillance...” Link

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