Found 13 article(s) for author 'Jeffrey Williamson'

Australian Squatters, Convicts, and Capitalists: Dividing Up a Fast-Growing Frontier Pie 1821-1871

Australian Squatters, Convicts, and Capitalists: Dividing Up a Fast-Growing Frontier Pie 1821-1871. Jeffrey Williamson, April 2017, Paper, “Compared with its nineteenth century competitors, Australian GDP per worker grew exceptionally fast, about twice that of the US and three times that of Britain. This paper asks whether the fast growth performance produced rising inequality. Using a novel data set we offer new evidence supporting unambiguously the view that, in sharp contrast with US, Australia underwent a revolutionary leveling in incomes between the 1820s and the 1870s. This assessment is based on our annual estimates of functional shares in the form of land rents, convict incomes, free unskilled incomes, free skill premiums, British imperial transfers and a capitalist residual.Link

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The Spread of Modern Industry to the Periphery since 1871

The Spread of Modern Industry to the Periphery since 1871. Jeffrey Williamson, 2017, Book, “Explores the nineteenth- and twentieth-century spread of modern industry to the global periphery. Demonstrates how, in the twenty-first century, economies in Asia, Latin America and even sub-Saharan Africa are converging on the historically-wealthy economies of Europe and North America. Seeks to understand the economic, historical, and political implications of this shift in industry. Offers a comparative assessment of twelve regions: Russia, East-Central Europe, Southeast Europe, Italy, the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia, China, Northern Latin America, and Southern Latin America.Link

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The Spread of Modern Industry to the Periphery since 1871

The Spread of Modern Industry to the Periphery since 1871. Jeffrey Williamson, 2017, Paper, “Ever since the Industrial Revolution of the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries, industrialization has been the key to modern economic growth. The fact that modern industry originated in Britain, and spread initially to north-western Europe and North America, implied a dramatic divergence in living standards between the industrial North (or ‘West’) and a non-industrial, or even de-industrializing, South (or ‘Rest’). This nineteenth-century divergence, which had profound economic, military, and geopolitical implications, has been studied in great detail by many economists and historians. Today, this divergence between the ‘West’ and the ‘Rest’ is visibly unravelling, as economies in Asia, Latin America and even sub-Saharan Africa converge on the rich economies of Europe and North America. This phenomenon, which is set to define the twenty-first century, both economically and politically, has also been the subject of a considerable amount of research.Link

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Has Latin American Inequality Changed Direction?

Has Latin American Inequality Changed Direction? Jeffrey Williamson, 2017, Book, “On the initiative of Professors Luis Bértola and Jeffrey Williamson, the Institute for the Integration of Latin America and the Caribbean (INTAL), together with the IDB’s Social Management, the ECLAC, and the World Bank, organized a regional conference in December 2014 with the motto “Latin American Inequality in the Long Run.” Buenos Aires hosted worldwide experts to identify the historical roots of the problem and to contribute proposals to prevent inequality from remaining the region’s distinguishing feature.Link

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Inequality in the Very Long Run: Malthus, Kuznets, and Ohlin

Inequality in the Very Long Run: Malthus, Kuznets, and Ohlin. Jeffrey Williamson, November 12, 2016, Paper, “What happened to the inequality of real income and wealth before, during, and after the Industrial Revolution? Just as the usual Industrial Revolution era (1750-1850) has been revised by historians of economic growth, so too the articles in this issue follow the lead of Van Zanden (1995) in opening up a new inequality history for earlier eras and other continents. Three of them offer new evidence on European wealth and income inequality movements in pre-industrial and industrial epochs. The fourth offers a new perspective on Latin American experience since the late nineteenth century, reporting a twentieth-century experience quite unlike the Great Leveling that Kuznets and others saw in Europe and the USA from World War 1 to the 1970s.Link

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Unequal Gains: American Growth and Inequality since 1700

Unequal Gains: American Growth and Inequality since 1700. Jeffrey Williamson, April 2016, Book. “Adopting a new approach to historical data, Peter H Lindert and Jeffrey G Williamson have charted the history of American incomes – and income inequality – since colonial times. Here the authors of Unequal Gains explain their method, and share a rich harvest of findings that cast new light on three-and-a-half centuries of economic history.Link

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Latin American Inequality: Colonial Origins, Commodity Booms or a Missed Twentieth-Century Leveling?

Latin American Inequality: Colonial Origins, Commodity Booms or a Missed Twentieth-Century Leveling? Jeffrey Williamson, May 27, 2015, Paper. “Most analysts of the modern Latin American economy have held the pessimistic belief in historical persistence—they believe that Latin America has always had very high levels of inequality, and that it is the Iberian colonists’ fault. Thus, modern analysts see today a more unequal Latin America compared with Asia and most rich post-industrial nations and assume that this must always have been true. Indeed, some have argued that high inequality appeared very early in the...” Link

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An Economic Rationale for the African Scramble: The Commercial Transition and the Commodity Price Boom of 1845-1885

An Economic Rationale for the African Scramble: The Commercial Transition and the Commodity Price Boom of 1845-1885. Jeffrey Williamson, May 2015, Paper. “This is the first study to present a unified quantitative account of African commodity trade in the long 19th century from the zenith of the Atlantic slave trade (1790s) to the eve of World War II (1939). Drawing evidence from a new dataset on export and import prices, volumes, composition and net barter terms of trade for five African regions, we show that Sub-Saharan Africa experienced a terms of trade boom that was comparable to other parts of the ‘global periphery’ from the late 18th century up to the mid-1880s, with an exceptionally sharp price boom…Link

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From Commodity Booms to Economic Miracles: Why Southeast Asian Industry Lagged Behind

From Commodity Booms to Economic Miracles: Why Southeast Asian Industry Lagged Behind. Jeffrey Williamson, May 2015, Paper. “Except for the Philippines between 1896 and 1939, Southeast Asia was never part of the century-long East Asian industrial catching up until after World War II. Before the 1950s, Southeast Asian manufacturing hardly grew at all: while commodity export processing did grow fast, import-competing manufacturing and manufacturing for local consumption did not. Singapore and Thailand started recording catching up growth rates on the western leaders only from the 1950s onwards, and Indonesia and Malaysia joined the club only after 1973…Link

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Distributional Consequences of Commodity Price Shocks: Australia Over A Century

Distributional Consequences of Commodity Price Shocks: Australia Over A Century. Jeffrey Williamson, January 7, 2015, Paper. “This paper studies the distributional impact of commodity price shocks over the short and the very long run. Using a GARCH model, we find that Australia experienced more volatility than many commodity exporting developing countries over the periods 1865–1940 and 1960–2008. We conduct cointegration tests to assess the commodity price shock inequality nexus. A single equation error correction model suggests that commodity price shocks increase the income share of the top 1, 0.05, and 0.01 percent…” Link

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