Found 74 article(s) for author 'Jeffrey Frankel'

Are Democrats Really Better for America’s Economy?

Are Democrats Really Better for America’s Economy? Jeffrey Frankel, June 22, 2016, Opinion. “Hillary Clinton has repeatedly claimed in recent months that the US economy does much better when a Democrat is in the White House. Coming from the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, that probably sounds like political spin. But the truth is that she is absolutely right.Link

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Rediscovering Fiscal Policy at the G7

Rediscovering Fiscal Policy at the G7. Jeffrey Frankel, May 24, 2016, Opinion. “As G7 leaders convene in Ise-Shima, Japan, the global economy’s fragility is a top concern. But instead of focusing on currency wars, the leaders of the major developed economies should be discussing fiscal policy, which under current conditions would be a more powerful tool than monetary policy for boosting economic activity. After all, today, unlike in normal times, the effects of fiscal policy would not be limited by too-high interest rates, inadequate private demand, strict capacity constraints, or excessive inflation.Link

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Reckoning with Inequality

Reckoning with Inequality. Jeffrey Frankel, March 22, 2016, Opinion. “When it comes to the rise in economic inequality since the 1970s in the United States and some other advanced economies, it doesn’t really matter which measure of income distribution we choose: They all show the increase. And, while many competing explanations have been proposed, we do not need to agree about causes to concur on sensible policies to address the problem.Link

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Who’s Right on US Financial Reform?

Who’s Right on US Financial Reform? Jeffrey Frankel, February 24, 2016, Opinion. “Eight years after triggering a crisis that nearly brought down the global financial system, the United States remains plagued by confusion about what reforms are needed to prevent it from happening again. As Americans prepare to choose their next president, a better understanding of the policy changes that would minimize the risk of future crises – and which politicians are most likely to implement them – is urgently needed.Link

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International Coordination

International Coordination. Jeffrey Frankel, January 2016, Paper. “After a 30-year absence, calls for international coordination of macroeconomic policy are back. This time the issues go by names like currency wars, taper tantrums, and fiscal compacts. In traditional game theory terms, the existence of spillovers implies that countries are potentially better off if they coordinate policies than under the Nash non-cooperative equilibrium. But what is the nature of the spillover and the coordination? The paper interprets recent macroeconomic history in terms of four possible frameworks for proposals to coordinate fiscal policy or monetary policy: the locomotive game, the discipline game, the competitive depreciation game and the competitive appreciation game.Link

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China’s Slowdown and the Chinese Stock Market

China’s Slowdown and the Chinese Stock Market. Jeffrey Frankel, January 27, 2016, Opinion. “The Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index has dropped substantially in the past few months. China’s growth rate has also slowed. This column argues that the slowdown of the Chinese economy has little to do with the stock exchange, and is mostly due to economic forces. The author recommends a package of policies that need to be implemented to smooth the transition to a sustainable growth rate.Link

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Globalization and Chinese Growth: Ends of Trends?

Globalization and Chinese Growth: Ends of Trends? Jeffrey Frankel, January 26, 2016, Paper. “Two big questions from 20 years ago look somewhat different today. First, would the long-term trend of globalization continue? Contrary to all predictions, trade growth has slowed markedly since the Global Financial Crisis of 2008-09. But the feared increase in protectionism did not materialize, so one must look elsewhere for explanations. Two likely factors behind the slowdown in trade are a maturing of global supply chains and a slowdown in trade-intensive physical investment.Link

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China’s Stock-Market Red Herring

China’s Stock-Market Red Herring. Jeffrey Frankel, January 25, 2016, Opinion. “With the Shanghai Stock Exchange Composite Index down more than 40% since last June, investors worldwide are watching the decline with growing concern – but not because they are invested in the plummeting market (China’s stocks are overwhelmingly held by Chinese). Rather, the fear is that plunging equity prices mean that China’s economy is going down the tubes. But those seeking compelling clues about China’s economic future should look elsewhere.Link

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Nominal GDP Targeting for Developing Countries

Nominal GDP Targeting for Developing Countries. Jeffrey Frankel, 2015, Paper. “Interest in nominal GDP (NGDP) targeting has come in the context of large advanced economies. Developing countries are better suited for it, however, in light of big supply shocks and terms of trade shocks, such as monsoon rains and oil import price shocks in the case of India. Under annual inflation targeting (IT), the full impact of adverse supply shocks is felt as lost real GDP. NGDP targeting automatically accommodates such shocks, while retaining the advantage of anchoring expectations. We derive the condition under which NGDP targeting would dominate other regimes such as annual IT, to achieve objectives of output and price stability. We estimate key parameters for the case of India and conclude that the condition may indeed hold.Link

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Jeffrey Frankel on Fiscal Policy, Macroprudential Regulation, Growth and Inequality

Jeffrey Frankel on Fiscal Policy, Macroprudential Regulation, Growth and Inequality December 2015. GrowthPolicy staff member Devjani Roy interviewed Harvard Kennedy School Professor Jeffrey Frankel, focusing on several questions motivating the GrowthPolicy website. Below is an edited version of Professor Frankel’s comments. Click here for more interviews like this one. What makes a robust fiscal policy? […]

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