Found 492 article(s) for author 'Inequality'

The Recent Growth Boom in Developing Economies: A Structural-Change Perspective

The Recent Growth Boom in Developing Economies: A Structural-Change Perspective. Dani Rodrick, January 2017, Paper, “Growth has accelerated in a wide range of developing countries over the last couple of decades, resulting in an extraordinary period of convergence with the advanced economies. We analyze this experience from the lens of structural change – the reallocation of labor from low- to high-productivity sectors. Patterns of structural change differ greatly in the recent growth experience. In contrast to the East Asian experience, none of the recent growth accelerations in Latin America, Africa, or South Asia was driven by rapid industrialization. Beyond that, we document that recent growth accelerations were based on either rapid within-sector labor productivity growth (Latin America) or growth-increasing structural change (Africa), but rarely both at the same time.Link

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Urban Economics for the Developing World: An Introduction

Urban Economics for the Developing World: An Introduction. Edward Glaeser, 2017, Paper, “This is an introduction to the special issue of the Journal of Urban Economics on “Urbanization in Developing Countries: Past and Present”. We argue that the rapid urbanization and the rise of cities in the developing world demand new avenues of research and much more research to deal with the urban issues facing billions of people across the world that current work barely covers. This issue contains papers which move in that direction and signals a commitment by the journal to pursue this agenda.LInk

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The Crisis of the Middle Class: Davos Panel

The Crisis of the Middle Class: Davos Panel. Lawrence Summers, January 18, 2017, Video, “IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde, Italian Economy and Finance Minister Pier Carlo Padoan, Harvard University President Emeritus Larry Summers, Bridgewater Chairman Ray Dalio, and Brazillian Finance Minister Henrique Meirelles discuss the global challenges facing the middle class with Bloomberg’s Francine Lacqua on the Crisis in the Middle Class panel at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Wednesday.Link

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Evidence That Minorities Perform Worse Under Biased Managers

Evidence That Minorities Perform Worse Under Biased Managers. Amanda Pallais, January 13, 2017, Paper, “There is a growing body of research showing that minorities face bias in the job application process. When identical resumes — one with the name Emily and one with the name Lakisha, for example — are sent to job openings, Emily’s resume gets substantially more callbacks. And even with the same credentials as other candidates, minorities are less likely to be hired.Link

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Understanding the Political Economy of the Eurozone Crisis: A Political Scientist’s Guide

Understanding the political economy of the Eurozone crisis: A Political Scientist’s Guide. Jeffry Frieden, 2017, Paper, “The Eurozone crisis constitutes a grave challenge to European integration. This essay presents an overview of the causes of the crisis, and analyzes why has it been so difficult to resolve. It focuses on how responses to the crisis were shaped by distributive conflicts both among and within countries. On the international level, debtor and creditor countries have fought over the distribution of responsibility for the accumulated debt; countries with current account surpluses and deficits have fought over who should implement the policies necessary to reduce the current account imbalances.Link

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Entrepreneurship and growth: lessons from an intellectual journey

Entrepreneurship and growth: lessons from an intellectual journey. Philippe Aghion, January 2017, Paper, “This lecture is the story of an intellectual journey, that of elaborating a new—Schumpeterian—theory of economic growth. A theory where (i) growth is generated by innovative entrepreneurs; (ii) entrepreneurial investments respond to incentives that are themselves shaped by economic policies and institutions; (iii) new innovations replace old technologies: in other words, growth involves creative destruction and therefore involves a permanent conflict between incumbents and new entrants. First, we motivate and then lay out the Schumpeterian paradigm and point to a set of empirical predictions which distinguish this paradigm from other growth models. Second, we raise four debates on which the Schumpeterian approach sheds new light: the middle income trap, secular stagnation, the recent rise in top income inequality, and firm dynamics. Third and last, we show how the paradigm can be used to think (or rethink) about growth policy design.Link

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Has Latin American Inequality Changed Direction?

Has Latin American Inequality Changed Direction? Jeffrey Williamson, 2017, Book, “On the initiative of Professors Luis Bértola and Jeffrey Williamson, the Institute for the Integration of Latin America and the Caribbean (INTAL), together with the IDB’s Social Management, the ECLAC, and the World Bank, organized a regional conference in December 2014 with the motto “Latin American Inequality in the Long Run.” Buenos Aires hosted worldwide experts to identify the historical roots of the problem and to contribute proposals to prevent inequality from remaining the region’s distinguishing feature.Link

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The Impact of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility II: County-Level Estimate

The Impact of Neighborhoods on Intergenerational Mobility II: County-Level Estimate. Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, 2016, Paper, “We characterize the effects of neighborhoods on children’s earnings and other outcomes in adulthood by studying more than five million families who move across counties in the U.S. We identify the causal effect of growing up in every county in the U.S. by estimating a fixed effects model identified from families who move across counties with children of different ages. We use these estimates to quantify the size of place effects, construct optimal forecasts of the causal effect for each place, and study the characteristics of places that cause higher (and lower) economic outcomes.Link

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‘Acting Wife’: Marriage Market Incentives and Labor Market Investments

‘Acting Wife’: Marriage Market Incentives and Labor Market Investments. Amanda Pallais, December 2016, Paper, “Do single women avoid career-enhancing actions because these actions could signal personality traits (like ambition) that are undesirable in the marriage market? We answer this question through two field experiments in an elite U.S. MBA program. Newly-admitted MBA students filled out a questionnaire on job preferences and personality traits to be used by the career center in internship placement; randomly selected students thought their answers would be shared with classmates. When they believed their classmates would not see their responses, single and non-single women answered similarly. However, single women reported desired salaries $18,000 lower and being willing to travel seven fewer days per month and work four fewer hours per week when they expected classmates would see their answers.Link

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