Found 30 article(s) for author 'India'

New 2025 Global Growth Projections Predict China’s Further Slowdown and the Continued Rise of India

New 2025 Global Growth Projections Predict China’s Further Slowdown and the Continued Rise of India. Center for International Development, June 28, 2017, Paper, “The economic pole of global growth has moved over the past few years from China to neighboring India, where it is likely to stay over the coming decade, according to new growth projections presented by researchers at the Center for International Development at Harvard University (CID). Growth in emerging markets is predicted to continue to outpace that of advanced economies, though not uniformly. The projections are optimistic about new growth hubs in East Africa and new segments of Southeast Asia, led by Indonesia and Vietnam. The growth projections are based on measures of each country’s economic complexity, which captures the diversity and sophistication of the productive capabilities embedded in its exports and the ease with which it could further diversify by expanding those capabilities.Link

Tags: , , , ,

Growth in India is meaningful and significant

Growth in India is meaningful and significant. Michael Porter, May 25, 2017, Video, “Stressing on the fact that competitiveness is important for sustained growth in India, Michael Porter of Harvard Business School said that growth in India is meaningful and significant. He also added that they do not enough data to assess job situation in India.Link

 

Tags: , ,

Getting India’s women into the workforce: Time for a smart approach

Getting India’s women into the workforce: Time for a smart approach. Rohini Pande, March 10, 2017, Opinion “Between 1990 and 2015, India’s real GDP (gross domestic product) per capita grew from US$375 to US$1572, but its female labour force participation rate (LFPR) fell from 37% to 28%. This gives us a puzzle to solve: why isn’t India following the same trajectory as most other countries at a similar level of growth, where female LFP rises with GDP?Link

Tags: , , , , , ,

The Role of Competition in Effective Outsourcing: Subsidized Food Distribution in Indonesia

The Role of Competition in Effective Outsourcing: Subsidized Food Distribution in Indonesia. Rema Hanna, March 2017, Paper, “Should government service delivery be outsourced to the private sector? If so, how? We conduct the first randomized field experiment on these issues, spread across 572 Indonesian localities. We show that allowing for outsourcing the last mile of a subsidized food delivery program reduced operating costs without sacrificing quality. However, prices paid by citizens were lower only where we exogenously increased competition in the bidding process. Corrupt elites attempted to block reform, but high rents in these areas also increased entry, offsetting this effect. The results suggest that sufficient competition is needed to ensure citizens share the gains from outsourcing.Link

Tags: , , , ,

Assessing Impact Of Demonetisation Remains A Moving Target

Assessing Impact Of Demonetisation Remains A Moving Target. Gita Gopinath, December 23, 2016, Video, “India’s experiment with demonetisation, the largest such exercise ever undertaken, has caught the attention of global economists. From former U.S. Treasury Secretary Larry Summers, who raised questions about how successful the move will be in curbing corruption, to Harvard Professor Kenneth Rogoff, who advised emerging economies not to ‘try this at home.’Link

Tags: , , ,

PM Narendra Modi’s Notes Ban Neither Intelligent Nor Humane: Amartya Sen To NDTV

PM Narendra Modi’s Notes Ban Neither Intelligent Nor Humane: Amartya Sen To NDTV. Amartya Sen, November 30, 2016, Video, “Despotic and authoritarian” is how Nobel Laureate and Bharat Ratna Amartya Sen describes the decision to abruptly ban 500- and 1000-rupee notes. “The alleged objective of dealing with black money is something all Indians would laud. But we have to ask whether this is the good way to do it? This decision is about minimal achievement and maximal suffering,” Dr Sen said, appearing from Harvard University on NDTV’s The Buck Stops Here.Link

Tags: , , , ,

India’s Currency Exchange and The Curse of Cash

India’s Currency Exchange and The Curse of Cash. Kenneth Rogoff, November 17, 2016, Opinion, “On the same day that the United States was carrying out its 2016 presidential election, India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, announced on national TV that the country’s two highest-denomination notes, the 500 and 1000 rupee (worth roughly $7.50 and $15.00) would no longer be legal tender by midnight that night, and that citizens would have until the end of the year to surrender their notes for new ones. His stated aim was to fight “black money”: cash used for tax evasion, crime, terror, and corruption. It was a bold, audacious move to radically alter the mindset of an economy where less than 2% of citizens pay income tax, and where official corruption is endemic.Link

Tags: , , ,

Multilevel Geographies of Poverty in India

Multilevel Geographies of Poverty in India. S V Subramanian, November 2016, Paper, “Since the economic reforms in India in 1991, there has been a proliferation of studies examining trends of economic development and poverty across the country. To date, studies have used single-level analyses with aggregated data either at the state level or, less commonly, at the region and district levels. This is the first comprehensive and empirical quantification of the relative importance of multiple geographic levels in shaping poverty distribution in India. We used multilevel logistic models to partition variation in poverty by levels of states, regions, districts, villages, and households. We also mapped the residuals at the state, region and district levels to visualize the geography of poverty. We used data on 35 states, 88 regions, 623 districts, 25,390 villages and 202,250 households from the National Sample Survey in years 2009-10 and 2011-12.” Link

Tags: , , , , ,

E-governance, Accountability, and Leakage in Public Programs: Experimental Evidence from a Financial Management Reform in India

E-governance, Accountability, and Leakage in Public Programs: Experimental Evidence from a Financial Management Reform in India. Rohini Pande, October 16, 2016, Paper, “In collaboration with the Government of Bihar, India, we conducted a large-scale experiment to evaluate whether transparency in fiscal transfer systems can increase accountability and reduce corruption in the implementation of a workfare program. The reforms introduced electronic fund-flow, cut out administrative tiers, and switched the basis of transfer amounts from forecasts to documented expenditures. Treatment reduced leakages along three measures: expenditures and hours claimed dropped while an independent household survey found no impact on actual employment and wages received; a matching exercise reveals a reduction in fake households on payrolls; and local program officials’ self-reported median personal assets fell.Link

Tags: , , , , , ,