Found 388 article(s) for author 'Financial Services'

Does Aggregated Returns Disclosure Increase Portfolio Risk Taking?

Does Aggregated Returns Disclosure Increase Portfolio Risk Taking? David Laibson, Brigitte Madrian, August 11, 2016, Paper, “Many experiments have found that participants take more investment risk if they see returns less frequently, see portfolio-level returns (rather than each individual asset’s returns), or see long-horizon (rather than one-year) historical return distributions. In contrast, we find that such information aggregation treatments do not affect total equity investment when we make the investment environment more realistic than in prior experiments. Previously documented aggregation effects are not robust to changes in the risky asset’s return distribution or the introduction of a multi-day delay between portfolio choice and return realization.Link

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Borrowing Requirements, Credit Access, and Adverse Selection: Evidence from Kenya

Borrowing Requirements, Credit Access, and Adverse Selection: Evidence from Kenya. Michael Kremer, July 18, 2016, Paper, “We examine the potential of asset-collateralized loans in low-income country credit markets. When a Kenyan dairy cooperative exogenously replaced high down payments and joint liability requirements with loans collateralized by the asset itself – a large water tank- loan take-up increased from 2.4% to 41.9%. In contrast, substituting joint liability requirements for deposit requirements had no impact on loan take up. There were no repossessions among farmers allowed to collateralize 75% of their loans, and a 0.7% repossession rate among those offered 96% asset collateralization. A Karlan-Zinman test based on waiving borrowing requirements ex post finds evidence of adverse selection with very low deposit requirements, but not of moral hazard.Link

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ESG for All? The Impact of ESG Screening on Return, Risk, and Diversification

ESG for All? The Impact of ESG Screening on Return, Risk, and Diversification. Robert Eccles, July 11, 2016, Paper. “A large body of research has documented a positive relationship between different measures of sustainability—such as indicators of employee satisfaction and effective corporate governance—and corporate financial performance. Nevertheless, many investors still struggle to quantify the value of ESG to investment performance.  To address this issue, the authors tested the effects of using different ESG filters on an investable universe that serves as the starting point for a fund manager. In this way, they attempted to determine the extent to which ESG data can add value to any investment approach, regardless of preferences towards sustainable investing.Link

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Liquidity Transformation in Asset Management: Evidence form the Cash Holdings of Mutual Funds

Liquidity Transformation in Asset Management: Evidence form the Cash Holdings of Mutual Funds. Adi Sunderam, July 2016, Paper, “We study liquidity transformation in mutual funds using a novel data set on their cash holdings. To provide investors with claims that are more liquid than the underlying assets, funds engage in substantial liquidity management. Specifically, they hold substantial amounts of cash, which they use to accommodate inflows and outflows rather than transacting in the underlying portfolio assets. This is particularly true for funds with illiquid assets and at times of low market liquidity. We provide evidence suggesting that mutual funds’ cash holdings are not large enough to fully mitigate price impact externalities created by the liquidity transformation they engage in.Link

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No More Dizzying Earnings Adjustments

No More Dizzying Earnings Adjustments. Robert Pozen, June 21, 2016, Opinion. “Whether Microsoft’s $26.2 billion purchase of LinkedIn makes sense might depend on where you look. Glancing at LinkedIn’s press release for the full year 2015, you will see a prominent projection for “adjusted” earnings this year of $950 million. Yet if you closely read the press release and its appendix, you can figure out that the company’s projected 2016 earnings under GAAP, the generally accepted accounting principles required in securities filings, are minus $240 million.Link

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Dollar Pricing Redux

Dollar Pricing Redux. Gita Gopinath, June 13, 2016, Paper, “A country’s exchange rate is at the center of economic and political debates on currency wars and trade competitiveness. The real consequences of exchange rate fluctuations depend critically on how firms set prices in international markets. Recent empirical evidence has challenged the dominant ‘producer currency’ pricing and ‘local currency’ pricing paradigms in the literature. In this paper we propose a new paradigm, consistent with the empirical evidence and characterized by three features: pricing in dollars, strategic complementarity in pricing and imported inputs in production. We call this the ‘dollar pricing’ paradigm and contrast its theoretical predictions with prior approaches in a general equilibrium New Keynesian model. We then employ novel data for Colombia to evaluate the implications of exchange rate fluctuations associated with commodity price shocks and show that the findings strongly support the dollar pricing paradigm.Link

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Publish the Secret Rules for Banks’ Living Wills

Publish the Secret Rules for Banks’ Living Wills. Hal Scott, June 10, 2016, Opinion. “The Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. recently determined that five of America’s largest banks do not have credible plans to go through bankruptcy without relying on extraordinary government support. If these five firms— J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Bank of New York Mellon and State Street—can’t develop “living wills” that satisfy regulators, then the Dodd-Frank Act authorizes the government to break them up as soon as 2018.Link

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Doing Bad by Doing Good? Theft and Abuse by Lenders in the Microfinance Markets of Uganda

Doing Bad by Doing Good? Theft and Abuse by Lenders in the Microfinance Markets of Uganda. Catherine Duggan, June 2016, Paper. “Microcredit transactions in developing countries create risks for borrowers that are routinely overlooked in the literature. This paper argues that common microfinance-lending methodologies that allow lenders to collateralize loans and unilaterally collect this security create opportunities for malicious lenders to steal from clients in good standing. In places where any lender can simply call itself a “microfinance institution” (MFI), opportunistic lenders can use the halo effect associated with microfinance to encourage borrowers to make themselves unusually vulnerable to theft. Evidence of these abuses can be seen in a case study of Uganda, where theft and fraud by a small number of microfinance institutions created a large-scale crisis and contributed to a precipitous decline in trust in the financial sector as a whole.Link

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The Volcker Rule as structural law: implications for cost-benefit analysis and administrative law

The Volcker Rule as structural law: implications for cost-benefit analysis and administrative law. John Coates, 2016, Paper. “The Volcker rule, a key part of Congress’s response to the financial crisis, is best understood as a “structural law,” a traditional Anglo-American technique for governance of hybrid public-private institutions such as banks and central banks. The tradition extends much farther back in time than the Glass-Steagall Act, to which the Volcker Rule has been unfavorably (but unfairly) compared. The goals of the Volcker Rule are complex and ambitious, and not limited to reducing risk directly, but include reshaping banks’ organizational cultures. Another body of structural laws, part of the core of administrative law, attempts to restrain and discipline regulatory agencies, through process requirements such as cost-benefit analysis (CBA). Could the Volcker rule be the subject of reliable, precise, quantified CBA? Given the nature of the Volcker rule as structural law, its ambitions, and the current capacities of CBA, the answer is clearly “no,” as it would require regulators to anticipate, in advance of data, private market behavior in response to novel activity constraints.Link

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