Found 398 article(s) for author 'Financial Services'

Diagnostic Expectations and Stock Returns

Diagnostic Expectations and Stock Returns. Andrei Shleifer, July 2017, Paper, “We revisit La Porta’s (1996) finding that returns on portfolios of stocks with the most optimistic analyst long term earnings growth forecasts are substantially lower than those for stocks with the most pessimistic forecasts. We document that this finding still holds, and present several further facts about the joint dynamics of fundamentals, expectations, and returns for these portfolios. We then propose a new approach to modeling belief formation and over-reaction to news that explains these facts, based on a portable psychological model of judgment by representativeness.Link

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Research: Hiring Chief Risk Officers Led Banks to Take on Even More Risk

Research: Hiring Chief Risk Officers Led Banks to Take on Even More Risk. Frank Dobbin, July 12, 2017, “Risk taking by big U.S. banks exploded in the years leading up to the 2008 financial crisis, with disastrous consequences for American firms, markets, and households. Much of the added risk, of course, came in the form of complex, opaque financial instruments like derivatives, the “financial weapons of mass destruction” that played such a central role in the crisis and the panic that followed.Link

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China Could Export a Recession to Everyone Else

China Could Export a Recession to Everyone Else. Kenneth Rogoff, July 5, 2017, Video, “Soaring debt levels in China were a serious concern as the fallout of any crisis would hit everyone else, said a former International Monetary Fund (IMF) economist on Thursday. “If there’s a country in the world which is really going to affect everyone else and which is vulnerable, it’s got to be China today,” Kenneth Rogoff, economics professor at Harvard University, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Thursday.Link

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The Trump administration—not the Fed—has it right on bank regulation

The Trump administration—not the Fed—has it right on bank regulation. Hal Scott, July 3, 2017, Opinion, “All 34 of the largest banks in the United States, representing over 75 percent of U.S. banking assets, recently passed the Federal Reserve Board’s annual stress tests for the first time since the tests were created in 2011. However, celebration is very premature.Link

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What Corporate Bankruptcy Can Teach Us About Morality

What Corporate Bankruptcy Can Teach Us About Morality. Mihir Desai, June 27, 2017, Audio, “Does the world of finance and markets needs a good infusion of humanity? One book examines how how a wider reading of the humanities can help you understand finance and — at the same time — how finance can help you understand the human condition. It’s by economist and Harvard Business School Professor Mihir Desai.  He joined Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio to discuss his latest book, “The Wisdom of Finance: Discovering Humanity in the World of Risk and Return.”Link

 

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Harvard Business School Professor Explains the Most Important Problem We Have In Finance Today And How To Fix It

Harvard Business School Professor Explains the Most Important Problem We Have In Finance Today And How To Fix It. Mihir Desai, June 5, 2017, Video, “Mihir Desai, a professor of Harvard Business School and the author of “Wisdom of Finance” explains why having shareholders who are separate from the managers hold great danger for finance today. Following is a transcript of the video.Link

 

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The Untenable Case for Perpetual Dual-Class Stock

The Untenable Case for Perpetual Dual-Class Stock. Lucian Bebchuk, June 2017, Paper, “The desirability of a dual-class structure, which enables founders of public companies to retain a lock on control while holding a minority of the company’s equity capital, has long been the subject of a heated debate. This debate has focused on whether dual-class stock is an efficient capital structure that should be permitted at the time of initial public offering (“IPO”). By contrast, we focus on how the passage of time since the IPO can be expected to affect the efficiency of such a structure.Link

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The Hazards of Expert Control: Chief Risk Officers and Risky Derivatives

The Hazards of Expert Control: Chief Risk Officers and Risky Derivatives. Frank Dobbin, May 31, 2017, Paper, “At the turn of the century, regulators introduced policies to control bank risk-taking. Many banks appointed chief risk officers (CROs), yet bank holdings of new, complex, and untested financial derivatives subsequently soared. Why did banks expand use of new derivatives? We suggest that CROs encouraged the rise of new derivatives in two ways. First, we build on institutional arguments about the expert construction of compliance, suggesting that risk experts arrived with an agenda of maximizing risk-adjusted returns, which led them to favor the derivatives. Second, we build on moral licensing arguments to suggest that bank appointment of CROs induced “organizational licensing,” leading trading-desk managers to reduce policing of their own risky behavior.Link

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