Found 22 article(s) for author 'Federal Reserve'

US Fed chair’s biggest problem will be staying out of Trump’s shadow

US Fed chair’s biggest problem will be staying out of Trump’s shadow. Kenneth Rogoff, November 3, 2017, Opinion, “With the appointment of Jerome Powell as the next chair of the United States Federal Reserve, Donald Trump has made perhaps the most important single decision of his presidency. It is a sane and sober choice that heralds short-term continuity in Fed interest rate policy, and perhaps a simpler and cleaner approach to regulatory policy.Link

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The Fed shortlist: who will hold the second most important job in the US?

The Fed shortlist: who will hold the second most important job in the US? Jeffrey Frankel, October 27, 2017, Opinion, “US President Donald Trump’s administration is expected, by 2 November, to announce its choice, subject to Senate approval, to succeed Janet Yellen as chair of the Federal Reserve Board in February 2018. The White House has indicated it is weighing up five potential candidates. Not all of them would be a good choice.Link

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Is Larry Summers A Fan Of Nominal GDP Level Targeting?

Is Larry Summers A Fan Of Nominal GDP Level Targeting? Lawrence Summers, September 19, 2017, Audio, “You are going to have to listen to my podcast with him to find out the answer. Here is a hint: We spent a portion of the show talking about NGDP level targeting (NGDPLT) and what it would take to actually get it implemented it at the Federal Reserve. So listen to the show to find out Larry’s thoughts on NGDPLT as well as his views on secular stagnation, Fed policy since the crisis, and macroeconomic policymaking in real time. It was a fun interview.Link

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Donald Trump’s 3% growth plan is only for the 1%

Donald Trump’s 3% growth plan is only for the 1%. Kenneth Rogoff, September 11, 2017, Opinion, “Donald Trump has boasted that his policies will produce sustained 3%-4% growth for many years to come. His prediction flies in the face of the judgment of many professional forecasters, including on Wall Street and at the Federal Reserve, who expect that the US will be lucky to achieve even 2% growth.Link

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Twenty Years of Time Series Econometrics in Ten Pictures

Twenty Years of Time Series – Econometrics in Ten Pictures. James Stock, Spring 2017, Paper, “Twenty years ago, empirical macroeconomists shared some common understandings. One was that a dynamic causal effect—for example, the effect on output growth of the Federal Reserve increasing the federal funds rate—is properly conceived as the effect of a shock, that is, of an unanticipated autonomous change linked to a specific source. Following Sims (1980), the use of vector autoregressions to estimate the dynamic causal effect of shocks on economic variables was widespread.Link

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Interest Rate Conundrums in the Twenty-First Century

Interest Rate Conundrums in the Twenty-First Century. Samuel Hanson, March 31, 2017, Paper, “A large literature argues that long-term interest rates appear to react far more to high-frequency (for example, daily or monthly) movements in short-term interest rates than is predicted by the standard expectations hypothesis. We find that, since 2000, such high-frequency “excess sensitivity” remains evident in U.S. data and has, if anything, grown stronger. By contrast, the positive association between low-frequency changes (such as those seen at a six- or twelve-month horizon) in short- and long-term interest rates, which was quite strong before 2000, has weakened substantially in recent years. As a result, “conundrums”— defined as six- or twelve-month periods in which short rates and long rates move in opposite directions—have become far more common since 2000.Link

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What Could Go Wrong in America?

What Could Go Wrong in America? Martin Feldstein, October 16, 2016, Opinion, “Although the United States economy is in good shape – with essentially full employment and an inflation rate close to 2% – a world of uncertainty makes it worthwhile to consider what could go wrong in the year ahead. After all, if the US economy runs into serious trouble, there will be adverse consequences for Europe, Japan, and many other countries.Link

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Is the Fed Playing Politics?

Is the Fed Playing Politics? Kenneth Rogoff, October 3, 2016, Opinion, “In his recent debate with his opponent Hillary Clinton, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump pressed his claim that US Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen is politically motivated. The Fed, Trump claims, is applying overdoses of monetary stimulus to hypnotize voters into believing that economic recovery is underway.Link

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The Fed’s Stress Tests Need to Be Transparent

The Fed’s Stress Tests Need to Be Transparent. Hal Scott, September 16, 2016, Opinion, “The stress tests that big American banks face each year are about to get more stressful. The Fed is planning to substantially increase—by an average of 57%, we calculate—the regulatory capital that the eight largest banks in the U.S. need to pass the annual tests.  Had these expected higher capital levels been in effect this year, it is likely that the country’s four largest banks ( J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Citigroup) all would have failed the test. As a consequence, they would have been barred from remitting more profits to their shareholders.Link

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