Found 28 article(s) for author 'Entrepreneurship'

The Harvard Research Center in Entrepreneurial History and the Daimonic Entrepreneur

The Harvard Research Center in Entrepreneurial History and the Daimonic Entrepreneur. Sophus Reinert, 2017, Paper, “This paper sketches the intellectual history of the Research Center in Entrepreneurial History, founded at Harvard in 1948, which helped established the contours of business history as a discipline. This history was shaped by the rivalry between N. S. B. Gras, the “father of business history,” and Arthur H. Cole, which defined still extant polarities in the field of business history. It provides context for the emergence of the figure of the “entrepreneur,” conceived of as an ambiguous and potent force of creative destruction, and of entrepreneurship as business history’s preeminent and vital dynamic. The paper focuses on German émigré Fritz L. Redlich, who was central to the Center’s work, and whose “creative entrepreneur” was conceived in explicit relation to the daimon, the godlike, frighteningly ambiguous, and often destructive power of inspiration and creativity.Link

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Household Matters: Revisiting the Returns to Capital among Female Micro-entrepreneurs

Household Matters: Revisiting the Returns to Capital among Female Micro-entrepreneurs. Rohini Pande, April 17, 2017, Paper, “Several field experiments find positive returns to grants for male and not female microentrepreneurs. But, these analyses largely overlook that male and female micro-entrepreneurs often belong to the same household. Using data from randomized trials in India, Sri Lanka and Ghana, we show that the gender gap in microenterprise performance is not due to a gap in aptitude. Instead, low average returns of female-run enterprises are observed because women’s capital is invested into their husbands’ enterprises rather than their own. When women are the sole household enterprise operator, capital shocks lead to large increases in profits. Household-level income gains are equivalent regardless of the grant or loan recipient’s gender.” Link

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Immigrants Play a Disproportionate Role in American Entrepreneurship

Immigrants Play a Disproportionate Role in American Entrepreneurship. William Kerr, October 3, 2016, Opinion, “Immigration is one of the most divisive and polarizing topics today. Do immigrants take American jobs, or help our economy grow? Do immigrants drain our welfare funds, or can they help refill public coffers as our baby boomers retire? One argument you tend to hear in the immigration debate in the U.S. is that there is a fixed number of jobs in the economy — and immigrants just compete for a slice of the pie rather than helping the pie grow. This perspective is less prevalent when talking about startups, however, because the rate of entrepreneurship has declined significantly in the U.S. over the last 30 years, and fewer startups are being generated today.” Link

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Social networks, ethnicity and entrepreneurship

Social Networks, Ethnicity and Entrepreneurship. William Kerr, October 31, 2015, Opinion. “The book Blue Dreams: Korean Americans and the Los Angeles Riots relates the story of Yun, a Korean university graduate who came to the US in the late 1970s to pursue higher degrees in mathematics. He ended up abandoning those plans to join a relative in running a small store selling trinkets. “There is an expression here: ’What you do depends on who picks you up at the airport,’” he noted. “I, too, followed my relative into the same business.” This story reflects the broad tendency among immigrant populations to concentrate around specific industries and entrepreneurship. This is not a new phenomenon; historical examples of ethnic specialisation range from the Jews in Medieval Europe to the Japanese in South America. Fairlie (2008) shows that immigrants are much more likely to be self-employed entrepreneurs than natives. Kuznets (1960) observed that “all minorities are characterised, at a given time, by an occupational structure distinctly narrower than that of the total population and the majority.”Link

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Enterprises as Innovation Schools

Enterprises as Innovation Schools. Calestous Juma, August/September 2015, Paper. “The article discusses the importance of entrepreneurship for economic transformation & job creation in Africa. It informs that mobile technology is one of major technological platform for enterprise development in Africa. It highlights business models which facilitate the acquisition of manufacturing capabilities. It highlights challenges faced by African countries to identify technology-based enterprises and promote industrial development.Link

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Social Networks, Ethnicity, and Entrepreneurship

Social Networks, Ethnicity, and Entrepreneurship. William Kerr, July 11, 2015, Paper. “We study the relationship between ethnicity, occupational choice, and entrepreneurship. Immigrant groups in the United States tend to cluster in very specific business sectors. For example, Koreans are 40 times more likely than other immigrants to operate dry cleaning shops, and Gujarati-speaking Indians are 70 times more likely to manage motels. We develop a model of social interactions where relationships facilitate the acquisition of sector-specific skills. The resulting scale economies generate occupational…Link

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Financing Entrepreneurial Experimentation

Financing Entrepreneurial Experimentation. Ramana Nanda, Matthew Rhodes-Kropf, June 2015, Paper, “The fundamental uncertainty of new technologies at their earliest stages implies that it is virtually impossible to know the true potential of a venture without learning about its viability through a sequence of investments over time. We show how this process of experimentation can be particularly valuable in the context of entrepreneurship because most new ventures fail completely, and only a few become extremely successful. We also shed light on important costs to this process of experimentation…Link

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Entrepreneurship and Urban Growth: An Empirical Assessment with Historical Mines

Entrepreneurship and Urban Growth: An Empirical Assessment with Historical Mines. Edward L. Glaeser, William R. Kerr, May 2015, Paper. “We study entrepreneurship and growth through the lens of U.S. cities. Initial entrepreneurship correlates strongly with urban employment growth, but endogeneity bedevils interpretation. Chinitz (1961) hypothesized that coal mines near cities led to specialization in industries, like steel, with significant scale economies and that those big firms subsequently damped entrepreneurship across several generations. Proximity to historical mining deposits is associated with reduced…” Link

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Immigrant Entrepreneurship

Immigrant Entrepreneurship. William R. Kerr, December 2014, Paper. “This chapter examines immigrant entrepreneurship and the survival and growth of immigrant-founded businesses over time relative to native-founded companies. We quantify immigrant contributions to new firm creation in a wide variety of fields and using multiple definitions. While significant research effort has gone into understanding the economic impact of immigration into the United States, comprehensive data for quantifying immigrant entrepreneurship are difficult to assemble…” Link

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House Money and Entrepreneurship

House Money and Entrepreneurship. William R. Kerr, Ramana Nanda. September 24, 2014, Paper. “We examine the relationship between house prices and entrepreneurship using microdata from the US Census Bureau. Increases in house prices are often thought to drive entrepreneurship through unlocking the collateral channel for bank loans, but this interpretation is challenged by worries regarding omitted variable biases (e.g., rising local demand) or wealth effects (i.e., that wealthier people are more likely to enter entrepreneurship for reasons other than access to collateral)…” Link

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