Found 17 article(s) for author 'Elhanan Helpman'

The Productivity Slowdown and the Declining Labor Share: A Neoclassical Exploration

The Productivity Slowdown and the Declining Labor Share: A Neoclassical Exploration. Elhanan Helpman, October 2017, Paper, “We explore the possibility that a global productivity slowdown is responsible for the widespread decline in the labor share of national income. In a neoclassical growth model with endogenous human capital accumulation a la Ben Porath (1967) and capital-skill complementarity a la Grossman et al. (2017), the steady-state labor share is positively correlated with the rates of capital-augmenting and labor-augmenting technological progress. We calibrate the key parameters describing the balanced growth path to U.S. data for the early post-war period and find that a one percentage point slowdown in the growth rate of per capita income can account for between one half and all of the observed decline in the US labor share.Link

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The Productivity Slowdown and the Declining Labor Share: A Neoclassical Exploration

The Productivity Slowdown and the Declining Labor Share: A Neoclassical Exploration. Elhanan Helpman, September 2017, Paper, “We explore the possibility that a global productivity slowdown is responsible for the widespread decline in the labor share of national income. In a neoclassical growth model with endogenous human capital accumulation a la Ben Porath (1967) and capital-skill complementarity a la Grossman et al. (2017), the steady-state labor share is positively correlated with the rates of capital-augmenting and labor-augmenting technological progress. We calibrate the key parameters describing the balanced growth path to U.S. data for the early postwar period and find that a one percentage point slowdown in the growth rate of per capita income can account for between one half and all of the observed decline in the U.S. labor share.Link

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Globalization and Wage Inequality

Globalization and Wage Inequality. Elhanan Helpman, December 9, 2016, Paper, “Globalization has been blamed for rising inequality in rich and poor countries. Yet the views of many protagonists in this debate are not based on evidence. To help form an evidence-based opinion, I review in this paper the theoretical and empirical literature on the relationship between globalization and wage inequality. While the initial analysis that started in the early 1990s focused on a particular mechanism that links trade to wages, subsequent studies have considered several other channels, and the quantitative assessment of the size of these influences has been carried out in multiple studies. Building on this research, I conclude that trade played an appreciable role in increasing wage inequality, but that its cumulative effect has been modest, and that globalization does not explain the preponderance of the rise in wage inequality within countries.Link

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Balanced Growth Despite Uzawa

Balanced Growth Despite Uzawa. Elhanan Helpman, 2016, Paper. “The evidence for the United States points to balanced growth despite falling investment-good prices and an elasticity of substitution between capital and labor less than one. This is inconsistent with the Uzawa Growth Theorem. We extend Uzawa’s theorem to show that the introduction of human capital accumulation in the standard way does not resolve the puzzle. However, balanced growth is possible if schooling is endogenous and capital is more complementary with schooling than with raw labor. We describe balanced growth paths for a variety of neoclassical growth models with capital-augmenting technological progress and endogenous schooling. The balanced growth path in an overlapping-generations model in which individuals choose the duration of their education matches key features of the U.S. economic record.Link

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Schooling and Balanced Growth

Schooling and Balanced Growth. Elhanan Helpman, February 28, 2016, Paper. “For the past few decades, the growth of industrialised economies has been remarkably balanced. This column suggests that such balanced growth results from schooling levels increasing over time. When capital and schooling are sufficiently complementary, increases in schooling offset the effect of capital deepening on the capital share and ensure that growth remains balanced.Link

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Balanced Growth Despite Uzawa

Balanced Growth Despite Uzawa. Elhanan Helpman, 2016, Paper. “Evidence for the United States suggests balanced growth despite falling investment-good prices and less than unitary elasticity of substitution between capital and labor. This is inconsistent with the Uzawa Growth Theorem. We extend Uzawa’s theorem to show that introducing human capital accumulation in the standard way does not resolve the puzzle. However, balanced growth is possible if education is endogenous and capital is more complementary with schooling than with raw labor. We describe balanced growth paths for several neoclassical growth models with capital-augmenting technological progress and endogenous schooling. The balanced growth path in an overlapping-generations model in which individuals choose their time in school matches key features of the U.S. record.Link

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Online Supplement for Trade and Inequality: From Theory to Estimation

Online Supplement for Trade and Inequality: From Theory to Estimation. Elhanan Helpman, October 28, 2015, Paper. “This online supplement contains the technical derivations for the theoretical results in the paper and reports additional empirical results and other information. Section B discusses reduced-form empirical findings for other countries that are consistent with our stylized facts for Brazil in Section 3 of the paper. Section C provides a full characterization of the structural model and discusses the relationship between the reduced-form coecients and structural parameters. Section D deals with econometric inference, including the derivation of the likelihood function and the generalized method of moments (GMM) bounds analysis. Section G discusses the data sources and denitions. Section H contains additional empirical results and robustness checks referred to in the paper.Link

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Trade Liberalization and Labor Market Dynamics with Heterogeneous Firms

Trade Liberalization and Labor Market Dynamics with Heterogeneous Firms. Elhanan Helpman, August 25, 2015, Paper. “Adjustment to trade liberalization is associated with substantial reallocation of labor across firms within sectors. This salient feature of the data is well captured by models of international trade with heterogeneous firms. In this paper we reconsider the adjustment of firms and workers to changes in trade costs, explicitly accounting for labor market frictions and the entire adjustment path from an initial to a final steady-state. The transitional dynamics exhibit rich patterns, varying across firms that differ in productivity levels…” Link

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Globalization and Growth

Globalization and Growth. Elhanan Helpman, May 2015, Paper. “How does globalization affect economic growth? We discuss mechanisms that link international integration to the incentives for knowledge accumulation and the efficacy of that process. First, integration facilitates the flow of knowledge across national borders. Second, integration affords innovators a larger potential market even as it subjects them to additional competition from foreign rivals. Third, integration encourages specialization according to comparative advantage. Finally, integration affects the incentives for technological diffusion. Taken together...” Link

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A Linder Hypothesis for Foreign Direct Investment

A Linder Hypothesis for Foreign Direct Investment. Elhanan Helpman, January 2015, Paper. “We study patterns of FDI in a multi-country world economy. We develop a model featuring non-homothetic preferences for quality and monopolistic competition in which specialization is purely demand-driven and the decision to serve foreign countries via exports or FDI depends on a proximity-concentration trade-off. We characterize the joint patterns of trade and FDI when countries differ in income distribution and size and show that FDI is more likely to occur between countries with similar per capita income levels. The model predicts a Linder…” Link

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