Found 80 article(s) for author 'Edward Glaeser'

Green Cities, Brown Suburbs

Green Cities, Brown Suburbs. Edward Glaeser, January 2009, Paper. “Contends that much local environmentalism, with its anti-development posture, is, in fact, bad for the environment & that urban development leaves a smaller carbon footprint than low-density suburbs. Attention is given to CA’s building restrictions, asserting that the state has things backwards…” Link

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The Economics of Place-Making Policies

The Economics of Place-Making Policies. Edward Glaeser, Joshua Gottlieb, October 2008, Paper. “Should the national government undertake policies aimed at strengthening the economies of particular localities or regions? Agglomeration economies and human capital spillovers suggest that such policies could enhance welfare. However, the mere existence of agglomeration externalities does not indicate which places should be subsidized. Without a better understanding of nonlinearities in these externalities, any government spatial policy is as likely to reduce as to increase welfare. Transportation spending has historically done…” Link

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The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development. Edward Glaeser, August 2008, Paper. “Carbon dioxide emissions may create significant social harm because of global warming, yet American urban development tends to be in low density areas with very hot summers. In this paper, we attempt to quantify the carbon dioxide emissions associated with new construction in different locations across the country. We look at emissions from driving, public transit, home heating, and household electricity usage. We find that the lowest emissions areas are generally in California and that the highest emissions…” Link

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Housing Supply and Housing Bubbles

Housing Supply and Housing Bubbles. Edward Glaeser, July 16, 2008, Paper. “Like many other assets, housing prices are quite volatile relative to observable changes in fundamentals. If we are going to understand boom-bust housing cycles, we must incorporate housing supply. In this paper, we present a simple model of housing bubbles that predicts that places with more elastic housing supply have fewer and shorter bubbles, with smaller price increases. However, the welfare consequences of bubbles may actually be higher in more elastic places because those places will overbuild more in response to a bubble…” Link

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Entrepreneurship and Urban Success: Toward a Policy Consensus

Entrepreneurship and Urban Success: Toward a Policy Consensus. Edward Glaeser, William Kerr, February 2008, Paper. “Like all politics, all entrepreneurship is local. Individuals launch firms and, if successful, expand their enterprises to other locations. But new firms must start somewhere, even if their businesses are conducted largely or exclusively on the Internet. Likewise, policymakers at local and state levels increasingly recognize that entrepreneurship is the key to building and sustaining their economies’ growth. Although this is a seemingly obvious proposition, it represents something of a departure from past…” Link

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Arbitrage in Housing Markets

Arbitrage in Housing Markets. Edward Glaeser, December 15, 2007, Paper. “Urban economists understand housing prices with a spatial equilibrium approach that assumes people must be indifferent across locations. Since the spatial no arbitrage condition is inherently imprecise, other economists have turned to different no arbitrage conditions, such as the prediction that individuals must be indifferent between owning and renting. This paper argues the predictions from these non-spatial, financial no arbitrage conditions are also quite imprecise. Owned homes are extremely different from rental units and owners are…” Link

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Did the Death of Distance Hurt Detroit and Help New York?

Did the Death of Distance Hurt Detroit and Help New York? Edward Glaeser, Giacomo Ponzetto, December 2007, Paper. “Urban proximity can reduce the costs of shipping goods and speed the flow of ideas. Improvements in communication technology might erode these advantages and allow people and firms to decentralize. However, improvements in transportation and communication technology can also increase the returns to new ideas, by allowing those ideas to be used throughout the world. This paper presents a model that illustrates these two rival effects that technological progress can have on cities…” Link

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Entrepreneurship and the City

Entrepreneurship and the City. Edward Glaeser, October 2007, Paper. “Why do levels of entrepreneurship differ across America’s cities? This paper presents basic facts on two measures of entrepreneurship: the self-employment rate and the number of small firms. Both of these measures are correlated with urban success, suggesting that more entrepreneurial cities are more successful. There is considerable variation in the self-employment rate across metropolitan areas, but about one-half of this heterogeneity can be explained by demographic and industrial variation. Self-employment is particularly associated with abundant, older…” Link

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When Are Ghettos Bad? Lessons from Immigrant Segregation in the United States

When Are Ghettos Bad? Lessons from Immigrant Segregation in the United States. Edward Glaeser, David Cutler, May 2007, Paper. “Recent literature on the relationship between ethnic or racial segregation and outcomes has failed to produce a consensus view of the role of ghettos; some studies suggest that residence in an enclave is beneficial, some reach the opposite conclusion, and still others imply that any relationship is small. This paper presents new evidence on this relationship using data on first-generation immigrants in the United States. Using average group characteristics as instruments for segregation, controlling…” Link

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The Rise of the Sunbelt

The Rise of the Sunbelt. Edward Glaeser, Kristina Tobio, April 2007, Paper. “In the last 50 years, population and incomes have increased steadily throughout much of the Sunbelt. This paper assesses the relative contributions of rising productivity, rising demand for Southern amenities and increases in housing supply to the growth of warm areas, using data on income, housing price and population growth. Before 1980, economic productivity increased significantly in warmer areas and drove the population growth in those places. Since 1980, productivity growth has been more modest, but housing supply growth has been…” Link

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