Found 78 article(s) for author 'Edward Glaeser'

Cities, Skills and Regional Change

Cities, Skills and Regional Change. Edward Glaeser, Kristina Tobio, April 2011, Paper. “One approach to urban areas emphasizes the existence of certain immutable relationships, such as Zipf’s or Gibrat’s law. An alternative view is that urban change reflects individual responses to changing tastes or technologies. This paper examines almost 200 years of regional change in the United States and finds that few, if any, growth relationships remain constant, including Gibrat’s law. Education does a reasonable job of explaining urban resilience in recent decades, but it does not seem to predict county growth a century ago. After reviewing this evidence…” Link

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Detroit’s Decline and the Folly of Light Rail

Detroit’s Decline and the Folly of Light Rail. Edward Glaeser, March 25, 2011, Opinion. “The Census just reported that Detroit’s population dropped by 25% between 2000 and 2010, a stunning fall that is even larger than the 20% drop Detroit experienced during the 1970s. The story of this city’s devastating decline reminds us that urban fortunes depend on entrepreneurial human capital. Failed public policies that tried to fix Detroit with urban renewal and transportation projects stand as stark evidence against the view that our economic woes call for more federal spending on infrastructure…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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Our Best Plan for Growth is to Set Our Cities Free

Our Best Plan for Growth is to Set Our Cities Free. Edward Glaeser, March 7, 2011, Paper. “Advanced economies are struggling to find an economic path past recession. On Sunday, David Cameron, the UK prime minister, promised an assault on the “enemies of enterprise”, while US president Barack Obama used January’s state of the union speech to promote jobs and competitiveness. But this new dash for growth is too often a battle of old ideas. To turn the corner, it must instead embrace the innovation that emerges naturally in our great urban centres.” (May require purchase or user account) Link

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Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier

Triumph of the City: How Our Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier. Edward Glaeser, February 10, 2011, Book. “America is an urban nation, yet cities get a bad rap: they’re dirty, poor, unhealthy, environmentally unfriendly… or are they? In this revelatory book, Edward Glaeser, a leading urban economist, declares that cities are actually the healthiest, greenest, and richest (in both cultural and economic terms) places to live. He travels through history and around the globe to reveal the hidden workings of cities and how they bring out the best in humankind. Using intrepid reportage, keen analysis, and…” Link

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How Skyscrapers Can Save the City

How Skyscrapers Can Save the City. Edward Glaeser, February 9, 2011, Paper. “Besides making cities more affordable and architecturally interesting, tall buildings are greener than sprawl, and they foster social capital and creativity. Yet some urban planners and preservationists seem to have a misplaced fear of heights that yields damaging restrictions on how tall a building can be. From New York to Paris to Mumbai, there’s a powerful case for building up, not out.” Link

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Rethinking the Federal Bias Toward Homeownership

Rethinking the Federal Bias Toward Homeownership. Edward Glaeser, 2011, Paper. “The most fundamental fact about rental housing in the United States is that rental units are overwhelmingly in multifamily structures. This fact surely reflects the agency problems associated with renting single-family dwellings, and it should influence all discussions of rental housing policy. Policies that encourage homeowning are implicitly encouraging people to move away from higher density living; policies that discourage renting are implicitly discouraging multifamily buildings. Two major distortions shape the rental housing market…” Link.

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Does Economic Inequality Cause Crises?

Does Economic Inequality Cause Crises? Edward Glaeser, December 14, 2010, Paper. “Did inequality cause the recent housing and financial crisis? For decades, a growing literature has tried to establish links between inequality and adverse outcomes, such as low economic growth,weak social cohesion and mortality and, most recently, financial crises. If true, these arguments would provide even more reasons to worry about our unequal income distribution. If false, we should still worry about income inequality, because in a just society everyone should have a decent standard of living and the opportunity to succeed. Empirically, it is true…” Link

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Housing Policy in the Wake of the Crash

Housing Policy in the Wake of the Crash. Edward Glaeser, Fall 2010, Paper. “Between 2000 and 2010, the U.S. housing market experineced a convulsion more extreme than in any previous recorded cycle. From May 2001 to May 2006, the Case/Shiller Standard & Poor’s twenty-city housing price index, which controls for changes in housing quality by comparing prices from repeat sales of the same homes, rose 54 percent more than consumer prices rose. In the three years that followed, housing prices, measured by the same index and corrected for inflation, fell more than on-third...” Link

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Start-Up City

Start-Up City. Edward Glaeser, Fall 2010, Paper. Like the rest of America, New York City has been buffeted by the recession that began in December 2007. This past August, the city’s unemployment rate stood at 9.6 percent, just over the national rate of 9.5. But New York’s economy will never recover from the downturn by trying to compete with China’s labor costs or with Houston’s housing costs. Nor can the city continue to rely on finance, which came to dominate it over the last 40 years: as the sad history of Detroit illustrates, one-industry towns rarely succeed in the long run. Rather, New York’s success will depend on its ability to…” Link

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The Secret to Job Growth: Think Small

The Secret to Job Growth: Think Small. Edward Glaeser, William Kerr, July 2010, Paper. “With job growth continuing to lag even as the economy picks up, local communities will be tempted to resume “smokestack chasing” – using tax breaks to attract big employers. That’s a misguided approach. Research shows that regional economic growth is highly correlated with the presence of many small, entrepreneurial employers – not a few big ones. In fact, a study of U.S. metro regions showed that cities whose number of “firms per worker” was 10% higher than the average in 1977 experienced 9%…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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