Found 65 article(s) for author 'Dani Rodrik'

The Real Heroes of the Global Economy

The Real Heroes of the Global Economy. Dani Rodrik, November 13, 2013, Opinion. “Economic policymakers seeking successful models to emulate apparently have an abundance of choices nowadays. Led by China, scores of emerging and developing countries have registered record-high growth rates over recent decades, setting precedents for others to follow. While advanced economies have performed far worse on average, there are notable exceptions, such as Germany and Sweden. “Do as we do,” these countries’ leaders often say, “and you will prosper, too…” Link verified June 19, 2014

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The Perils of Premature Deindustrialization

The Perils of Premature Deindustrialization. Dani Rodrik, October 11, 2013, Opinion. “Most of today’s advanced economies became what they are by traveling the well-worn path of industrialization. A progression of manufacturing industries – textiles, steel, automobiles – emerged from the ashes of the traditional craft and guild systems, transforming agrarian societies into urban ones. Peasants became factory workers, a process that underpinned not only an unprecedented rise in economic productivity, but also a wholesale revolution in social and political organization. The labor movement led to mass politics…” Link verified June 19, 2014

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Globalization, Structural Change, and Productivity Growth, with an Update on Africa

Globalization, Structural Change, and Productivity Growth, with an Update on Africa. Dani Rodrik, October 2013, Paper. “One of the earliest and most central insights of the literature on economic development is that development entails structural change. The countries that manage to pull out of poverty and get richer are those that are able to diversify away from agriculture and other traditional products. As labor and other resources move from agriculture into modern economic activities, overall productivity rises and incomes expand...” Link

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Structural Change, Fundamentals, and Growth: An Overview

Structural Change, Fundamentals, and Growth: An Overview. Dani Rodrik, September, 2013, Paper. “Two traditions exist side‐by-side within growth economics.  One of them has its roots in development economics and is based on the dual economy approach first formalized by Lewis (1954) and Ranis and Fei (1961). The other has its roots in macroeconomics, and derives from the neoclassical growth model of Solow (1956).  The dual economy tradition draws a sharp distinction between the traditional and modern sectors of the economy, typically characterized as agriculture and industry, respectively…” Link verified June 19, 2014

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The Past, Present, and Future of Economic Growth

The Past, Present, and Future of Economic Growth. Dani Rodrik, Paper, June 2013. “Developing countries will face stronger headwinds in the decades ahead, both because the global economy is likely to be significantly less buoyant than in recent decades and because technological changes are rendering manufacturing more capital and skill intensive. Desirable policies will continue to share features that have served successful countries well in the past, but growth strategies will differ in their emphasis. Ultimately, growth will depend primarily on what happens at home. The challenge is therefore to design an architecture…” Link

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Europe’s Way Out

Europe’s Way Out. Dani Rodrik. June 12, 2013. Opinion. “It seems that austerity is out of fashion in the eurozone – at least for the moment. The European Commission has given Spain, France, and the Netherlands more time to comply with the European Union’s 3%-of-GDP deficit ceiling. Even German government officials now concede that something more than fiscal belt-tightening is needed to revive the economies of the eurozone periphery…” Link v

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The Past, Present, and Future of Economic Growth

The Past, Present, and Future of Economic Growth. Dani Rodrik, June 2013, Paper. “Developing countries will face stronger headwinds in the decades ahead, both because the global economy is likely to be significantly less buoyant than in recent decades and because technological changes are rendering manufacturing more capital and skill intensive. Desirable policies will continue to share features that have served successful countries well in the past, but growth strategies will differ in their emphasis. Ultimately, growth will depend primarily on what happens at home…” Link

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Unconditional Convergence in Manufacturing

Unconditional Convergence in Manufacturing. Dani Rodrik, Paper, May 2013. “Unlike economies as a whole, manufacturing industries exhibit strong unconditional convergence in labor productivity. The article documents this at various levels of disaggregation for a large sample covering more than 100 countries over recent decades. The result is highly robust to changes in the sample and specification. The coefficient of unconditional convergence is estimated quite precisely and is large, at between 2–3% in most specifications and 2.9% a year in the baseline specification covering 118 countries. The article also finds…” Link

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What the World Needs from the BRICS

What the World Needs from the BRICS. Dani Rodrik. April 10, 2013. Opinion. “In 2001, Goldman Sachs’ Jim O’Neill famously coined the term BRIC to characterize the world’s four largest developing economies – Brazil, Russia, India, and China. But, more than a decade later, just about the only thing that these countries have in common is that they are the only economies ranked among the world’s 15 largest (adjusted for purchasing power) that are not members of the OECD…” Link verified June 19, 2014

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The Tyranny of Political Economy

The Tyranny of Political Economy. Dani Rodrik. February 8, 2013. Opinion. “There was a time when we economists steered clear of politics. We viewed our job as describing how market economies work, when they fail, and how well-designed policies can enhance efficiency. We analyzed trade-offs between competing objectives (say, equity versus efficiency), and prescribed policies to meet desired economic outcomes, including redistribution. It was up to politicians to take our advice (or not), and to bureaucrats to implement it…” Link verified June 19, 2014

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