Found 65 article(s) for author 'Dani Rodrik'

Don’t Cry Over Dead Trade Agreements

Don’t Cry Over Dead Trade Agreements. Dani Rodrik, December 8, 2016, Opinion, “The seven decades since the end of World War II were an era of trade agreements. The world’s major economies were in a perpetual state of trade negotiations, concluding two major global multilateral deals: the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the treaty establishing the World Trade Organization. In addition, more than 500 bilateral and regional trade agreements were signed – the vast majority of them since the WTO replaced the GATT in 1995.Link

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No Time for Trade Fundamentalism

No Time for Trade Fundamentalism. Dani Rodrik, October 14, 2016, Opinion, ““One of the crucial challenges” of our era “is to maintain an open and expanding international trade system.” Unfortunately, “the liberal principles” of the world trade system “are under increasing attack.” “Protectionism has become increasingly prevalent.” “There is great danger that the system will break down … or that it will collapse in a grim replay of the 1930s.”Link

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Put Globalization to Work for Democracies

Put Globalization to Work for Democracies. Dani Rodrik, September 17, 2016, Opinion, “A Chinese student once described his country’s globalization strategy to me. China, he said, opened a window to the world economy, but placed a screen on it. The country got the fresh air it needed — nearly 700 million people have been lifted from extreme poverty since the early 1980s — but kept mosquitoes out. China benefited from the flourishing of trade and investment across national borders. For many, this was the magic of globalization.Link

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The False Economic Promise of Global Governance

The False Economic Promise of Global Governance. Dani Rodrik, August 11, 2016, Opinion, “Global governance is the mantra of our era’s elite. The surge in cross-border flows of goods, services, capital, and information produced by technological innovation and market liberalization has made the world’s countries too interconnected, their argument goes, for any country to be able to solve its economic problems on its own. We need global rules, global agreements, global institutions.Link

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Comments: Dani Rodrik and James E. Rauch

Comments: Dani Rodrik and James E. Rauch. Dani Rodrik, 2016, Book Chapter, “The fascinating papers in part I of this book focus on the causes and consequences of corruption, primarily from a domestic perspective. We learn that corruption is a multifaceted and complex phenomenon, that it is often deeply rooted in the politics of a country, and that it is measurably costly in terms of foregone investment and growth opportunities as well as in terms of equity.Link

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Innovation Is Not Enough

Innovation Is Not Enough. Dani Rodrik, June 3, 2016, Opinion. “We seem to be living in an accelerated age of revolutionary technological breakthroughs. Barely a day passes without the announcement of some major new development in artificial intelligence, biotechnology, digitization, or automation. Yet those who are supposed to know where it is all taking us can’t make up their minds.Link

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Fairness and Free Trade

Fairness and Free Trade. Dani Rodrik, May 12, 2016, Opinion. “The global trade system faces an important turning point at the end of this year, one that was postponed when China joined the World Trade Organization almost 15 years ago. The United States and the European Union must decide whether they will begin to treat China as a “market economy” in their trade policies. Unfortunately, even as the battle escalates over the course of this year, the terms of the choice ensure that nothing will be done to address the global trade regime’s deeper flaws.Link

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Towards a Better Global Economy: Policy Implications for Citizens Worldwide in the 21st Century

Towards a Better Global Economy: Policy Implications for Citizens Worldwide in the 21st Century. Dani Rodrik, 2016, Book. “Substantial progress in the fight against extreme poverty was made in the last two decades. But the slowdown in global economic growth and significant increases in income inequality in many developed and developing countries raise serious concerns about the continuation of this trend into the 21st century. The time has come to seriously think about how improvements in official global governance, coupled with and reinforced by rising activism of ‘global citizens’ can lead to welfare-enhancing and more equitable results for global citizens through better national and international policies. This book examines the factors that are most likely to facilitate the process of beneficial economic growth in low-, middle-, and high-income countries.Link

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Is Liberal Democracy Feasible in Developing Countries?

Is Liberal Democracy Feasible in Developing Countries? Dani Rodrik, March 9, 2016, Paper. “Liberal democracy has been difficult to institute and sustain in developing countries. This has to do both with ideational factors—the absence of a liberal tradition prior to electoral mobilization—and structural conditions—the prevalence of mass mobilization along identity rather than class cleavages. This paper considers the conditions under which liberal democracy emerges and speculates about its future in developing countries.Link

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The Evolution of Work

The Evolution of Work. Dani Rodrik, December 9, 2015, Opinion. “In mid-December, the United Nations will launch the latest of its annual landmark Human Development Reports. This year’s report focuses on the nature of work: how the way we earn a living is being transformed by economic globalization, new technologies, and innovations in social organization. The outlook for developing countries, in particular, is decidedly mixed. For most people most of the time, work is mostly unpleasant. Historically, doing lots of backbreaking work is how countries have become rich. And being rich is how some people get the chance to do more pleasant work…” Link

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