Found 65 article(s) for author 'Dani Rodrik'

Green Industrial Policy: Accelerating Structural Change towards Wealthy Green Economies

Green Industrial Policy: Accelerating Structural Change towards Wealthy Green Economies. Dani Rodrik, 2017, Paper, “There are two major reasons for governments and societies to accelerate structural change in their economies and proactively shape its direction. First, there is the challenge of creating wealth. Structural change, that is, the reallocation of capital and labour from low- to high-productivity activities, is a key driver of productivity growth and higher incomes. This is particularly important for developing countries where incomes are low and poverty is pervasive. According to the latest available estimates, 767 million people lived on less than $1.90 a day, and 1.9 billion people in the developing world still had less than US $ 3.10 a day in 20131 – a clear indication that the current structural composition of national economies does not provide a sufficient number of productive jobs.Link

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The Mexican Paradox

The Mexican Paradox. Dani Rodrik, August 10, 2017, Opinion, “After a series of macroeconomic crises in the mid-1990s, Mexico undertook bold reforms, from liberalizing its economic policies to investing in education. But, while these efforts brought some benefits, they failed to spur significant productivity and economic growth.Link

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The G20’s Misguided Globalism

The G20’s Misguided Globalism. Dani Rodrik, July 6, 2017, Opinion, “This year’s G20 summit in Hamburg promises to be among the more interesting in recent years. For one thing, US President Donald Trump, who treats multilateralism and international cooperation with cherished disdain, will be attending for the first time. Trump comes to Hamburg having already walked out of one of the key commitments from last year’s summit – to join the Paris climate agreement “as soon as possible.” And he will not have much enthusiasm for these meetings’ habitual exhortation to foreswear protectionism or provide greater assistance to refugees.Link

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Populism and the Economics of Globalization

Populism and the Economics of Globalization. Dani Rodrik, June 2017, Paper, “Populism may seem like it has come out of nowhere, but it has been on the rise for a while. I argue that economic history and economic theory both provide ample grounds for anticipating that advanced stages of economic globalization would produce a political backlash. While the backlash may have been predictable, the specific form it took was less so. I distinguish between left-wing and right-wing variants of populism, which differ with respect to the societal cleavages that populist politicians highlight. The first has been predominant in Latin America, and the second in Europe. I argue that these different reactions are related to the relative salience of different types of globalization shocks.Link

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Too Late to Compensate Free Trade’s Losers

Too Late to Compensate Free Trade’s Losers. Dani Rodrik, April 11, 2017, Opinion, “It appears that a new consensus has taken hold these days among the world’s business and policy elites about how to address the anti-globalization backlash that populists such as Donald Trump have so ably exploited. Gone are the confident assertions that globalization benefits everyone: we must, the elites now concede, accept that globalization produces both winners and losers. But the correct response is not to halt or reverse globalization; it is to ensure that the losers are compensated.Link

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How Much Europe Can Europe Tolerate?

How Much Europe Can Europe Tolerate? Dani Rodrik, March 14, 2017, Opinion, “This month the European Union will celebrate the 60th anniversary of its founding treaty, the Treaty of Rome, which established the European Economic Community. There certainly is much to celebrate. After centuries of war, upheaval, and mass killings, Europe is peaceful and democratic. The EU has brought 11 former Soviet-bloc countries into its fold, successfully guiding their post-communist transitions. And, in an age of inequality, EU member countries exhibit the lowest income gaps anywhere in the world.Link

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Global Citizens, National Shirkers

Global Citizens, National Shirkers. Dani Rodrik, February 10, 2017, Opinion, “Last October, British Prime Minister Theresa May shocked many when she disparaged the idea of global citizenship. “If you believe you’re a citizen of the world,” she said, “you’re a citizen of nowhere.” Her statement was met with derision and alarm in the financial media and among liberal commentators. “The most useful form of citizenship these days,” one analyst lectured her, “is one dedicated not only to the well-being of a Berkshire parish, say, but to the planet.” The Economist called it an “illiberal” turn. A scholar accused her of repudiating Enlightenment values and warned of “echoes of 1933” in her speech.Link

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Is Global Equality the Enemy of National Equality?

Is Global Equality the Enemy of National Equality? Dani Rodrik, January 2017, Paper, “The bulk of global inequality is accounted for by income differences across countries rather than within countries. Expanding trade with China has aggravated inequality in some advanced economies, while ameliorating global inequality. But the “China shock” is receding and other low-income countries are unlikely to replicate China’s export-oriented industrialization experience. Relaxing restrictions on cross-border labor mobility might have an even stronger positive effect on global inequality. However it also raises a similar tension. While there would likely be adverse effects on low-skill workers in the advanced economies, international labor mobility has some advantages compared to further liberalizing international trade in goods. I argue that none of the contending perspectives — national-egalitarian, cosmopolitan, utilitarian — provides on its own an adequate frame for evaluating the consequences.Link

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The Recent Growth Boom in Developing Economies: A Structural-Change Perspective

The Recent Growth Boom in Developing Economies: A Structural-Change Perspective. Dani Rodrick, January 2017, Paper, “Growth has accelerated in a wide range of developing countries over the last couple of decades, resulting in an extraordinary period of convergence with the advanced economies. We analyze this experience from the lens of structural change – the reallocation of labor from low- to high-productivity sectors. Patterns of structural change differ greatly in the recent growth experience. In contrast to the East Asian experience, none of the recent growth accelerations in Latin America, Africa, or South Asia was driven by rapid industrialization. Beyond that, we document that recent growth accelerations were based on either rapid within-sector labor productivity growth (Latin America) or growth-increasing structural change (Africa), but rarely both at the same time.Link

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