Found 21 article(s) for author 'Dale Jorgenson'

The emergence of the new economic order: Growth in the G7 and the G20

The emergence of the new economic order: Growth in the G7 and the G20. Dale Jorgenson, May 2013, Paper. “The massive reconfiguration of the world economy over the next decade will lead to a New Economic Order by 2020. China will displace the U.S. as the world’s leading economy and India will overtake Japan. This will shift the balance of the G20 from the leading industrialized economies of the G7 to the emerging economies, especially China and India. The rise of the Asian model of economic growth will underscore the importance of globalization and…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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Double Dividend – Environmental Taxes and Fiscal Reform in the United States

Double Dividend – Environmental Taxes and Fiscal Reform in the United States. Dale Jorgenson, 2013, Book. “Energy utilization, especially from fossil fuels, creates hidden costs in the form of pollution and environmental damages. The costs are well documented but are hidden in the sense that they occur outside the market, are not reflected in market prices, and are not taken into account by energy users. Double Dividend presents a novel method for designing environmental taxes that correct market prices so that they reflect the true cost of energy…” May require purchase or user account. Link Verified October 12, 2014

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Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling

Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling. Dale Jorgenson, November 16, 2012, Book. “In this collection of 17 articles, top scholars synthesize and analyze scholarship on this widely used tool of policy analysis, setting forth its accomplishments, difficulties, and means of implementation. Though CGE modeling does not play a prominent role in top US graduate schools, it is employed universally in the development of economic policy. This collection is particularly important because it presents a history of modeling applications and examines competing points of view…” (May require user account or purchase) Link

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The Rise of Developing Asia and The New Economic Order

The Rise of Developing Asia and The New Economic Order. Dale Jorgenson, June 8, 2011, Paper. “This paper identifies emerging trends in the world economy during the next decade. The first is that China will overtake the U.S. in terms of gross domestic product (GDP), ending more than a century of U.S. leadership as the world’s largest economy. The second is that Developing Asia, excluding Japan, will overtake the G7, a group of the seven largest industrialized economies established in 1975-6. Finally, India will overtake Japan, Russia will overtake Germany, and Brazil will overtake the U.K., leading to a New World Economic Order: China…” Link

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Innovation and Productivity Growth

Innovation and Productivity Growth. Dale Jorgenson, 2011, Paper. “The computer equipment manufacturing industry comprised only 0.3 percent of U.S. value added from 1960–2007, but generated 2.7 percent of economic growth and 25 percent of productivity growth. By comparison agriculture accounted for 1.8 percent of U.S. value added, but only 1.0 percent of economic growth during this period. This reflects the fact that agriculture has grown more slowly than the U.S. economy, while the computer industry has grown thirteen times as fast. However, agriculture accounted for fifteen percent of U.S. productivity growth, indicating…” Link

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Potential Growth of the World Economy

Potential Growth of the World Economy. Dale Jorgenson, 2010, Paper. “This paper introduces a new framework for projecting potential growth of the world economy, emphasizing the contribution of information technology. We first analyze the sources of economic growth for the world economy, seven regions, and fourteen major economies during four periods – 1989-1995, 1995-2000, 2000-2004, and 2004-2008. The contribution of investment in information technology has increased in all regions, but especially in industrialized economies and Developing Asia. We then project the potential growth rates…” (May require user account or purchase) Link

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Growth Accounting within the International Comparison Program

Growth Accounting within the International Comparison Program. Dale Jorgenson, April 2009, Paper. “This paper analyzes the sources of economic growth of the world economy, seven regions, and fourteen major economies during three periods – 1989-1995, 1995-2000, and 2000- 2006. We allocate the growth of world output, as measured in the World Bank’s International Comparison Program, between input growth and productivity. We find, surprisingly, that input growth greatly predominates! Moreover, except for the industrialized economies, differences in per capita output levels are explained by differences in per capita input, rather...” Link

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Taxation, Efficiency, and Economic Growth

Taxation, Efficiency, and Economic Growth. Dale Jorgenson, Mun Ho, May 9, 2008, Book Chapter. “In this paper we model U.S. labor supply and demand over the next 25 years. Despite the anticipated aging of the population, moderate population growth will provide growing supplies of labor well into the 21st century. Improvements in labor quality due to greater education and experience will also continue for some time, but will eventually disappear. Productivity growth for the U.S. economy will be below long-term historical averages, but labor-using technical change will be a stimulus to the growth of labor demand. Year to-year changes in economic...” Link

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U.S. Labor Supply and Demand in the Long Run

U.S. Labor Supply and Demand in the Long Run. Dale Jorgenson, Mun Ho, May 9, 2008, Paper. “In this paper we model U.S. labor supply and demand over the next 25 years. Despite the anticipated aging of the population, moderate population growth will provide growing supplies of labor well into the 21st century. Improvements in labor quality due to greater education and experience will also continue for some time, but will eventually disappear. Productivity growth for the U.S. economy will be below long-term historical averages, but labor-using technical change will be a stimulus to the growth of labor demand. Year to-year changes in economic…” Link

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