Found 49 article(s) for author 'Carmen Reinhart'

Capital Flow Cycles: A Long, Global View

Capital Flow Cycles: A Long, Global View. Carmen Reinhart, October 31, 2017, Paper, “This paper develops a new, extensive database on international capital flows over the past 200 years by combining long-run data on international debt issuance, the current account, and central bank reserves across countries. We show that crossborder financial flows from financial centers to the periphery are cyclical, with similar patterns over time. We document the interaction between the capital flow cycle, the commodity price super-cycle, and short-term interest rates.Link

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The Fear Factor in Today’s Interest Rates

The Fear Factor in Today’s Interest Rates. Carmen Reinhart, September 23, 2017, Opinion, “Atlantic-hugging policymakers and pundits, buffered by a continent and a large ocean, may not fully appreciate the significant effect on global financial markets that the threat posed by North Korea has had in recent months. But competition for safe assets has clearly heated up.Link

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One Hundred Years of Indebtedness

One Hundred Years of Indebtedness. Carmen Reinhart, June 30, 2017, Opinion, “Gabriel Garcia Márquez, the Nobel laureate novelist most famous for One Hundred Years of Solitude, was native to Colombia. Nonetheless, as a master of magical realism, Garcia Márquez would have appreciated the Republic of Argentina’s recent combination of fact and fantasy. In mid-June, the finance ministry sold $2.75 billion worth of US dollar-denominated bonds that mature in one hundred years.Link

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Trump’s Magic Budget

Trump’s Magic Budget. Carmen Reinhart, May 29, 2017, Opinion, “US President Donald Trump’s administration has now released its budget plans for fiscal year 2018. Among the details provided in the document, entitled America First – A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again, are projections for the expected path of gross federal debt as a percentage of GDP, which is shown to decline from its current level of about 106% to about 80% in 2027. Debt held by the public is expected to mirror this path, shrinking from 77% to 60% over this period.Link

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Addicted to Dollars

Addicted to Dollars. Carmen Reinhart, March 1, 2017, Opinion, “Since the end of World War II, the United States’ share in world GDP has fallen from nearly 30% to about 18%. Other advanced economies have also experienced sustained declines in their respective slices of the global pie. But you wouldn’t know it from looking at the international monetary system.Link

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The Country Chronologies to Exchange Rate Arrangements into the 21st Century: Will the Anchor Currency Hold?

The Country Chronologies to Exchange Rate Arrangements into the 21st Century: Will the Anchor Currency Hold? Carmen Reinhart, Kenneth Rogoff, February 2017, Paper, “Detailed country-by-country chronologies are an informative companion piece to our paper “Exchange Arrangements Entering the 21st Century: Which Anchor Will Hold?,” which provides a comprehensive history of anchor or reference currencies, exchange rate arrangements, and a new measure of foreign exchange restrictions for 194 countries and territories over 1946-2016. The individual country chronologies are also a central component of our approach to classifying regimes. These country histories date dual or multiple exchange rate episodes, as well as to differentiate between pre-announced pegs, crawling pegs, and bands from their de facto counterparts. We think it is important to distinguish between say, de facto pegs or bands from announced pegs or bands, because their properties are potentially different. The chronologies also flag the dates for important turning points, such as when the exchange rate first floated, or when the anchor currency was changed. We extend our chronologies as far back as possible, even though we only classify regimes from 1946 onwards.Link

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Is the Deflation Cycle Over?

Is the Deflation Cycle Over? Carmen Reinhart, January 31, 2017, Opinion, “Until the global financial crisis of 2008-2009, deflation had all but disappeared as a concern for policymakers and investors in the advanced economies, apart from Japan, which has been subject to persistent downward pressure on prices for nearly a generation. And now deflationary fears are on the wane again.Link

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The Return of Dollar Shortages

The Return of Dollar Shortages. Carmen Reinhart, October 24, 2016, Opinion, “Immediately after World War II ended, a new phrase entered the economic lexicon: “dollar shortage.” European economies were coping with extensive war-related damage and a broad array of impediments to their efforts to rebuild their industrial base. At the time, the United States was the only provider of capital equipment for reconstruction. So, without access to US dollars, Europe’s economies could not obtain the inputs needed to increase their exports.Link

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The Perils of Debt Complacency

The Perils of Debt Complacency. Carmen Reinhart, September 28, 2016, Opinion, ““What a government spends the public pays for. There is no such thing as an uncovered deficit.” So said John Maynard Keynes in A Tract on Monetary Reform.  But Robert Skidelsky, the author of a magisterial three-volume biography of Keynes, disagrees. In a recent commentary entitled “The Scarecrow of National Debt,” Skidelsky offered a rather patronizing narrative, in a tone usually reserved for young children and pets, about his aged, old-fashioned, and financially illiterate friend’s baseless anxiety about the burden placed on future generations by the rising level of government debt.Link

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