Found 18 article(s) for author 'Africa'

Political institutions and economic growth in Africa’s ‘Renaissance’

Political institutions and economic growth in Africa’s ‘Renaissance’. Robert H. Bates, October 11, 2017, Paper, “In the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, many African states replaced authoritarian political regimes with competitive electoral systems; the economies of many also began to grow, some for the first time in decades. We argue that democratic reform led to economic growth, as did Acemoglu, Naidu, Restrepo and Robinson in an earlier paper. Our approach differs from theirs in that while we to seek to identify a causal relationship between democracy and development, we build our analysis around the qualitative accounts of regional specialists and the reasoning of political economists. Where others test for the existence of a causal account, we test for the existence of specific casual mechanisms.Link

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Politics, Academics, and Africa

Politics, Academics, and Africa. Robert Bates, 2017, Paper, “The roots of my fascination with politics and Africa run deep; so too does my need for clarity. The combination drove me into the professoriate. My research in Africa convinced me that modernization theory was wrong: The people I came to know in the field were sophisticated in their politics. Additional research convinced me that market-oriented approaches to political economy were wrong and that government intervention could lead to increases in productivity and welfare. Because neoclassical approaches are flexible, I continue to think in terms of strategy and choice and to apply them to the study of development.Link

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Understanding the long-run effects of Africa’s slave trades

Understanding the long-run effects of Africa’s slave trades. Nathan Nunn, February 27, 2017, Paper, “Evidence suggests that Africa’s slave trades played an important part in the shaping of the continent not only in terms of economic outcomes, but cultural and social outcomes as well. This column, taken from a recently published VoxEU eBook, summarises studies that reveal the lasting toxic effects of Africa’s four waves of slave trades on contemporary development.Link

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Africa’s Prospects for Enjoying a Demographic Dividend

Africa’s Prospects for Enjoying a Demographic Dividend. David Bloom, August 2016, “We assess Africa’s prospects for enjoying a demographic dividend. While fertility rates and dependency ratios in Africa remain high, they have started to decline. According to UN projections, they will fall further in the coming decades such that by the mid-21st century the ratio of the working-age to dependent population will be greater than in Asia, Europe, and Northern America. This projection suggests Africa has considerable potential to enjoy a demographic dividend. Whether and when it actually materializes, and also its magnitude, hinges on policies and institutions in key realms that include macroeconomic management, human capital, trade, governance, and labor and capital markets. Given strong complementarities among these areas, coordinated policies will likely be most effective in generating the momentum needed to pull Africa’s economies out of a development trap.Link

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Doing Bad by Doing Good? Theft and Abuse by Lenders in the Microfinance Markets of Uganda

Doing Bad by Doing Good? Theft and Abuse by Lenders in the Microfinance Markets of Uganda. Catherine Duggan, June 2016, Paper. “Microcredit transactions in developing countries create risks for borrowers that are routinely overlooked in the literature. This paper argues that common microfinance-lending methodologies that allow lenders to collateralize loans and unilaterally collect this security create opportunities for malicious lenders to steal from clients in good standing. In places where any lender can simply call itself a “microfinance institution” (MFI), opportunistic lenders can use the halo effect associated with microfinance to encourage borrowers to make themselves unusually vulnerable to theft. Evidence of these abuses can be seen in a case study of Uganda, where theft and fraud by a small number of microfinance institutions created a large-scale crisis and contributed to a precipitous decline in trust in the financial sector as a whole.Link

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Why our stereotypes of African agriculture are all wrong

Why our stereotypes of African agriculture are all wrong. Calestous Juma, June 1, 2016, Opinion, “From newspaper editors to TV anchors to bloggers, the default symbol of African agriculture is an African woman holding a hand hoe. This imagery highlights the drudgery African women face in farming. But it also conflates family farming with the broader agricultural enterprise.Link

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Education, Research, and Innovation in Africa

Education, Research, and Innovation in Africa. Calestous Juma, February 2016, Paper. “Africa is a youthful continent: nearly 41% of its population is under the age of 18. To address the unique challenges of this demographic structure, the African Union (AU) has adopted a 50-year Agenda 2063 to help guide the socioeconomic transformation of the continent with particular reference to the youth. One of the objectives of Agenda 2063 is to reposition the continent as a strategic player in the global economy through improved education and application of science and technology in development. The AU’s Science, Technology and Innovation Strategy for Africa, 2024 (STISA-2024) provides an intial 10-year framework for pursuing this goal.Link

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The Political Origins of Africa’s Economic Revival

The Political Origins of Africa’s Economic Revival. Robert Bates, 2015, Book Chapter. “Writing in the 1990s, William Easterly and Ross Levine (1997) famously labeled Africa a “growth tragedy.” Less than 20 years later, Alwyn Young (2012) noted Africa’s “growth miracle,” and Steven Radelet (2010) less effusively pointed to an Africa that was “emerging” and noted the continent’s rising rate of economic growth, improving levels of education and health care, and increasing levels of investment in basic infrastructure: roads, ports, and transport. In this paper we address Africa’s economic revival. In doing so, we also stress the political changes that have taken place on the continent.Link

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Enterprises as Innovation Schools

Enterprises as Innovation Schools. Calestous Juma, August/September 2015, Paper. “The article discusses the importance of entrepreneurship for economic transformation & job creation in Africa. It informs that mobile technology is one of major technological platform for enterprise development in Africa. It highlights business models which facilitate the acquisition of manufacturing capabilities. It highlights challenges faced by African countries to identify technology-based enterprises and promote industrial development.Link

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Infrastructure for innovation

Infrastructure for innovation. Calestous Juma, June 26, 2015, Opinion, “Infrastructural development and technological innovation are both vital to Africa’s economic future. Policymakers are currently more focused on infrastructure; they should not forget its critical role in spurring innovation. Infrastructure is both the backbone for the economy but also the motherboard for technological innovation. Without adequate infrastructure, Africa’s economies cannot realise their full potential. The continent’s low economic performance and weak integration into the global economy is in part a result of inadequate infrastructure…Link

 

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