Found 21 article(s) for author 'Adi Sunderam'

The Financial Regulatory Reform Agenda in 2017

The Financial Regulatory Reform Agenda in 2017. Robin Greenwood, Samuel Hanson, Jeremy Stein, Adi Sunderam, February 2017, Paper, “We take stock of the post-crisis financial regulatory reform agenda. We highlight and summarize areas of clear progress, where post-crisis reforms should either be maintained or built upon. We then identify several areas where the new regulations could be streamlined or rolled back in an effort to reduce the burden on the financial sector, particularly on smaller banks.Link

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The Cross Section of Bank Value

The Cross Section of Bank Value. Adi Sunderam, November 2016, Paper, “We study the determinants of value creation within U.S. commercial banks. We focus on three theoretically-motivated drivers of bank value: screening and monitoring, “safe” deposit production, and synergies between deposit-taking and lending. To assess the relative contributions of each, we develop novel measures of banks’ deposit productivity and asset productivity and use these measures to evaluate the cross-section of bank value. We find that variation in deposit productivity explains the majority of variation in bank value, consistent with theories emphasizing safe-asset production. We also find evidence of meaningful value creation from synergies between deposit-taking and lending. Overall, our findings suggest that banks are primarily “special” due to their unique liability structure rather than their ability to screen and monitor borrowers.Link

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Precautionary Savings in Stocks and Bonds

Precautionary Savings in Stocks and Bonds. Emil Siriwardane, Adi Sunderam, November 20, 2016, Paper, “We document a strong and robust relation between the one-year real rate and precautionary savings motives, as measured by the stock market. Our novel proxy for precautionary savings, based on the difference in valuations between low- and highvolatility stocks, explains 37% of variation in the real rate. In addition, the real rate forecasts returns on the low-minus-high volatility portfolio, though it appears unrelated with measures of the quantity of risk. Our results suggest that precautionary savings motives, and thus the real rate, are driven by time-varying attitudes towards risk. We rationalize these findings in a stylized model with segmented investor clienteles and habit formation.Link

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Liquidity Transformation in Asset Management: Evidence form the Cash Holdings of Mutual Funds

Liquidity Transformation in Asset Management: Evidence form the Cash Holdings of Mutual Funds. Adi Sunderam, July 2016, Paper, “We study liquidity transformation in mutual funds using a novel data set on their cash holdings. To provide investors with claims that are more liquid than the underlying assets, funds engage in substantial liquidity management. Specifically, they hold substantial amounts of cash, which they use to accommodate inflows and outflows rather than transacting in the underlying portfolio assets. This is particularly true for funds with illiquid assets and at times of low market liquidity. We provide evidence suggesting that mutual funds’ cash holdings are not large enough to fully mitigate price impact externalities created by the liquidity transformation they engage in.Link

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The Fed, the Bond Market, and Gradualism in Monetary Policy

The Fed, the Bond Market, and Gradualism in Monetary Policy. Adi Sunderam, Jeremy Stein, February 2016, Paper. “We develop a model of monetary policy with two key features: (i) the central bank has some private information about its long-run target for the policy rate; and (ii) the central bank is averse to bond-market volatility. In this setting, discretionary monetary policy is gradualist: the central bank only adjusts the policy rate slowly in response to changes in its target. Such gradualism represents an attempt to not spook the bond market. However, this effort is unsuccessful in equilibrium, as long-term rates rationally react more to a given move in short rates when the central bank moves more gradually. The same desire to mitigate bond-market volatility can lead the central bank to lower short rates sharply when publicly-observed term premiums rise. In both cases, there is a time-consistency problem, and society would be better off with a central banker who cares less about the bond market.Link

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Liquidity Transformation in Asset Management: Evidence from the Cash Holdings of Mutual Funds

Liquidity Transformation in Asset Management: Evidence from the Cash Holdings of Mutual Funds. Adi Sunderam, July 21, 2015, Paper. “Using a novel data set on the cash holdings of mutual funds, we show that cash plays an important role in how mutual funds provide liquidity to their investors. Rather than transacting in equities or bonds, mutual funds use cash to accommodate inflows and outflows. This is particularly true for funds with illiquid assets and at times of low aggregate market liquidity. We show that economies of scale in liquidity provision are limited for mutual funds. Mutual funds are large holders of cash in the aggregate…Link

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Gradualism in Monetary Policy: A Time-Consistency Problem?

Gradualism in Monetary Policy: A Time-Consistency Problem? Jeremy C. Stein, Adi Sunderam, June 2015, Paper. “We develop a model of monetary policy with two key features: (i) the central bank has private information about its long-run target for the policy rate; and (ii) the central bank is averse to bond-market volatility. In this setting, discretionary monetary policy is gradualist, or inertial, in the sense that the central bank only adjusts the policy rate slowly in response to changes in its privately-observed target. Such gradualism reflects an attempt to not spook the bond market. However, this effort ends up being thwarted in equilibrium…”  Link

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Who Neglects Risk? Investor Experience and the Credit Boom

Who Neglects Risk? Investor Experience and the Credit Boom. Samuel G. Hanson, Adi Sunderam, April 2015, Paper. “Many argue that overoptimistic thinking on the part of lenders helps fuel credit booms. We use new micro-data on mutual funds’ holdings of securitizations to examine which investors are susceptible to such boom-time thinking. We show that firsthand experience plays a key role in shaping investors beliefs. During the 2003 to 2007 mortgage boom, inexperienced fund managers loaded up on securitizations linked to nonprime mortgages, accumulating twice the holdings of more seasoned managers by 2007…” Link

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