Wages, Prices, and Employment in a Keynesian Long Run. Stephen Marglin, 2017, Paper, “The central question this paper addresses is the same one I explored in my joint work with Amit Bhaduri 25 years ago: under what circumstances are high wages good for employment? I extend our 1990 argument in three directions. First, instead of mark-up pricing, I model labor and product markets separately. The labor supply to the capitalist sector of the economy is assumed à la Lewis to be unlimited. Consequently the wage cannot be determined endogenously but is fixed by an extended notion of subsistence based on Smith, Ricardo, and Marx. For tractability the product market is assumed to be perfectly competitive. The second innovation is to show how disequilibrium adjustment resolves the overdetermination inherent in the model.Link

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Internalizing Global Value Chains: A Firm-Level Analysis. Laura Alfaro, Pol Antras, July 2017, Paper, “In this Appendix, we provide more details on firm behavior conditional on the path of ownership structure along the value chain. Notice first that solving program (5), we obtain the following optimal choice of investment by the supplier at stage…Link

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Generations of Advantage: Multigenerational Correlations in Family Wealth. Alexandra Killewald, June 2017, Paper, “Inequality in family wealth is high, yet we know little about how much and how wealth inequality is maintained across generations. We argue that a long-term, life-course perspective reflective of wealth’s cumulative nature is crucial to understand the extent and channels of wealth reproduction across generations. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics that span nearly half a century, we show that a one decile increase in parental wealth position is associated with an increase of about 4 percentiles in offspring wealth position in adulthood.Link

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Populism and the Economics of Globalization. Dani Rodrik, June 2017, Paper, “Populism may seem like it has come out of nowhere, but it has been on the rise for a while. I argue that economic history and economic theory both provide ample grounds for anticipating that advanced stages of economic globalization would produce a political backlash. While the backlash may have been predictable, the specific form it took was less so. I distinguish between left-wing and right-wing variants of populism, which differ with respect to the societal cleavages that populist politicians highlight. The first has been predominant in Latin America, and the second in Europe. I argue that these different reactions are related to the relative salience of different types of globalization shocks.Link

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One Hundred Years of Indebtedness. Carmen Reinhart, June 30, 2017, Opinion, “Gabriel Garcia Márquez, the Nobel laureate novelist most famous for One Hundred Years of Solitude, was native to Colombia. Nonetheless, as a master of magical realism, Garcia Márquez would have appreciated the Republic of Argentina’s recent combination of fact and fantasy. In mid-June, the finance ministry sold $2.75 billion worth of US dollar-denominated bonds that mature in one hundred years.Link

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New 2025 Global Growth Projections Predict China’s Further Slowdown and the Continued Rise of India. Center for International Development, June 28, 2017, Paper, “The economic pole of global growth has moved over the past few years from China to neighboring India, where it is likely to stay over the coming decade, according to new growth projections presented by researchers at the Center for International Development at Harvard University (CID). Growth in emerging markets is predicted to continue to outpace that of advanced economies, though not uniformly. The projections are optimistic about new growth hubs in East Africa and new segments of Southeast Asia, led by Indonesia and Vietnam. The growth projections are based on measures of each country’s economic complexity, which captures the diversity and sophistication of the productive capabilities embedded in its exports and the ease with which it could further diversify by expanding those capabilities.Link

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Patent Trolling Isn’t Dead — It’s Just Moving to Delaware. Lauren Cohen, June 28, 2017, Paper, “For years, the small East Texas town of Marshall has held a special status in patent litigation: poster city for opportunistic “patent trolling” lawsuits brought by nonpracticing entities, firms that amass patents for the sake of pursuing license fees and litigation. Thanks to last month’s Supreme Court ruling in TC Heartland v. Kraft Foods Group, Marshall’s dominant position as a patent trolling venue may soon end. But will patent trolling be reduced overall? Unlikely.Link

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Trump’s Sugar Swamp. Jeffrey Frankel, June 22, 2017, Opinion, “As the United States, Mexico, and Canada prepare to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, as US President Donald Trump’s administration has demanded, much attention is being devoted to one item in particular: sugar. The negotiations will probably produce a sweet deal for the US sugar industry, highlighting the emptiness of Trump’s promises to “drain the swamp” of special-interest influence over policymaking.Link

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What Corporate Bankruptcy Can Teach Us About Morality. Mihir Desai, June 27, 2017, Audio, “Does the world of finance and markets needs a good infusion of humanity? One book examines how how a wider reading of the humanities can help you understand finance and — at the same time — how finance can help you understand the human condition. It’s by economist and Harvard Business School Professor Mihir Desai.  He joined Marketplace Morning Report host David Brancaccio to discuss his latest book, “The Wisdom of Finance: Discovering Humanity in the World of Risk and Return.”Link

 

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Does Addressing Bilateral Trade Imbalances Work? Martin Feldstein, June 27, 2017, Opinion, “Politicians and economists view trade imbalances very differently. Consider the United States’ trade deficit. Economists emphasize that the total US trade deficit with the rest of the world is the result of policies and actions at home. Simply put, if the US invests more than the country as a whole saves, it must import the difference from the rest of the world, creating the existing trade deficit.” Link

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