What I do support in a new tax plan. Lawrence Summers, October 25, 2017, Opinion, “I have been very sharply critical of what I regard as unprofessional exaggeration by advocates of the Trump tax proposal. Reasonably enough, people have asked what I am for. I strongly support tax reform in general and especially corporate tax reform on the model of the highly successful bipartisan 1986 tax reform, which achieved very large rate reductions, spurred economic growth and improved the efficiency of the economy while being revenue- and distribution-neutral.Link

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The Business Roundtable’s outlandish tax cut claims. Lawrence Summers, October 23, 2017, Opinion, “I think of myself as pro-business. I frequently counseled the Obama administration that “business confidence is the cheapest form of stimulus,” and during my times in government have found meetings with business leaders very helpful in understanding economic policy challenges. So when the Business Roundtable (BRT) does an analysis, I pay close attention.Link

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One last time on who benefits from corporate tax cuts. Lawrence Summers, October 22, 2017, Opinion, “I recently asserted that Kevin Hassett deserved a failing grade for his “analysis” projecting that the Trump administration proposal to reduce the corporate tax rate from 35 to 20 percent would raise the wages of an average American family between $4,000 to $9,000. I chose harsh language because Hassett had, for what seemed like political reasons, impugned the integrity of people like Len Burman and Gene Steuerle who have devoted their lives to honest rigorous evaluation of tax measures by calling their work “scientifically indefensible” and “fiction.” Since there have been a variety of comments on the economics of corporate tax reduction, some further discussion seems warranted.Link

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Advances in Economics and Econometrics: Volume 1: Eleventh World Congress. Ariel Pakes, October 2017, Book, “This is the first of two volumes containing papers and commentaries presented at the Eleventh World Congress of the Econometric Society, held in Montreal, Canada in August 2015. These papers provide state-of-the-art guides to the most important recent research in economics. The book includes surveys and interpretations of key developments in economics and econometrics, and discussion of future directions for a wide variety of topics, covering both theory and application. These volumes provide a unique, accessible survey of progress on the discipline, written by leading specialists in their fields. The first volume includes theoretical and applied papers addressing topics such as dynamic mechanism design, agency problems, and networks.Link

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Efficient Welfare Weights. Nathaniel Hendren, October 2017, Paper, “How should we measure economic efficiency? The canonical measure is an unweighted sum of willingnesses to pay. In contrast, this paper provides efficient welfare weights that implement the Kaldor-Hicks tests for efficiency but account for the distortionary cost of taxation. The shape of the income distribution yields bounds on these weights that suggest it is efficient to weight surplus to the poor more than to the rich. Point estimates suggest surplus to the poor should be weighted 1.5-2x more than surplus to the rich. I illustrate how to use these weights to evaluate the efficiency of government policy changes.” Link

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Trump’s top economist’s tax analysis isn’t just wrong, it’s dishonest. Lawrence Summers, October 17, 2017, Opinion, “Kevin Hassett, the White House’s chief economist, accused me of an ad-hominem attack against his analysis of the Trump administration’s tax plan. I am proudly guilty of asserting that it is some combination of dishonest, incompetent and absurd. Television does not provide space to spell out the reasons why, so I am happy to provide them here.Link

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Hassett’s flawed analysis of the Trump tax plan. Lawrence Summers, October 17, 2017, Video, “Kevin Hassett, chair of the Council of Economic Advisers, accuses me of an ad-hominem attack against his economic analysis of the Trump administration’s tax plan. I am proudly guilty of asserting that it is some combination of dishonest, incompetent and absurd. TV does not provide space to spell out the reasons why, so I am happy to provide them here.Link

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Four Proposals to Help Commodity Exporters Cope with Price Volatility. Jeffrey Frankel, October 17, 2017, Paper, “Financial markets have done little, if anything, to moderate the impact of commodity price volatility on the exporting countries. This column reviews four proposals to make exporters less vulnerable to volatility – two attempts at appropriate financial engineering, and two attempts at countercyclical macroeconomic policy. One in each category is tried and tested; the other two have hardly been tried.Link

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Counting and Caring. Lawrence Summers, October 17, 2017, Paper, “The article presents the author’s views on economist Howard Raiffa who is known for his contributions to both decision sciences and negotiation analysis. Topics include the impact of Howard’s book “Decision Analysis” on the author in developing intellectual interests; and the role of his book in helping the author learn about Bayesian models and group decision making.Link

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The IMF, Gender Equality and Labour. Martha Chen, October 2017, Book, “Recent research from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) recognizes that macroeconomic policies can help to redress gender inequalities by creating more fiscal space for key public investments in infrastructure, education and health. Such investments reduce the time women spend on domestic chores and caring for their families, giving them more opportunities to engage in paid work. For women home-based workers, who produce goods and services from their own homes, basic infrastructure services make their homes more productive workplaces.” Link

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