U.S. Labor Supply and Demand in the Long Run. Dale Jorgenson, Mun Ho, May 9, 2008, Paper. “In this paper we model U.S. labor supply and demand over the next 25 years. Despite the anticipated aging of the population, moderate population growth will provide growing supplies of labor well into the 21st century. Improvements in labor quality due to greater education and experience will also continue for some time, but will eventually disappear. Productivity growth for the U.S. economy will be below long-term historical averages, but labor-using technical change will be a stimulus to the growth of labor demand. Year to-year changes in economic…” Link

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Why Doesn’t Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries? An Empirical Investigation. Laura Alfaro, May 2008, Paper. “We examine the empirical role of different explanations for the lack of flows of capital from rich to poor countries—the ‘Lucas Paradox.’ The theoretical explanations include cross country differences in fundamentals that affect productivity and capital market imperfections. We show that during 1970−2000 low institutional quality is the leading explanation. Improving Peru’s institutional quality to Australia’s level implies a quadrupling of foreign investmentRecent studies emphasize the role of…” Link

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Examining Beneficiation, Ricardo Hausmann, Robert Lawrence, May 2008, Paper, Beneficiation, moving downstream, and promoting greater value added in natural resources are very common policy initiatives to stimulate new export sectors in developing countries, largely based on the premise that this is a natural and logical path for structural transformation. But upon closer examination, we find that very few countries that export raw materials also export their processed forms, or transition to greater processing. Link

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Final Recommendations of the International Panel on ASGISA, Ricardo Hausmann, May 2008, Paper, As part of the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative (ASGI-SA), the National Treasury of the Republic of South Africa convened an international panel of economists through Harvard’s Center for International Development. This panel spent two years analyzing the South African economy and its growth prospects, and composed 20 papers spanning all aspects of economic policy. The present paper synthesizes this body of work. We summarize the panel’s assessment of the binding constraints to growth in South Africa and provide specific policy recommendations to help achieve the goal of accelerated and shared growth. Link

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Reconfiguring Industrial Policy: A Framework with an Application to South Africa. Ricardo Hausmann, Dani Rodrik, May 2008. “The main purpose of industrial policy is to speed up the process of structural change towards higher productivity activities. This paper builds on our earlier writings to present an overall design for the conduct of industrial policy in a low- to middle-income country. It is stimulated by the specific problems faced by South Africa and by our discussions with business and government officials in that country. We present specific recommendations for the South African government in the penultimate section of the paper.” Link

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Credit Constraints and the Cyclicality of R&D Investment: Evidence from France. Philippe Aghion, April 28, 2008, Paper. “We use a French firm-level data set containing 13,000 firms over the period 1993-2004 to analyze the relationship between credit constraints and firms’ R&D behavior over the business cycle. Our main results can be summarized as follows: (i) the share of R&D investment over total investment is countercyclical without credit constraints, but it becomes less countercyclical as firms face tighter credit constraints…” Link Verified October 29, 2014

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Can Technology Save the Economy? Dale Jorgenson, April 21, 2008, Video. “Dale Jorgenson, a professor in the department of economics at Harvard University, talks about the pros and cons of the stimulus package.” Link

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Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness. Cass Sunstein, April 8, 2008, Book. “Every day, we make decisions on topics ranging from personal investments to schools for our children to the meals we eat to the causes we champion. Unfortunately, we often choose poorly. The reason, the authors explain in this important exploration of choice architecture, is that, being human, we all are susceptible to various biases that can lead us to blunder. Our mistakes make us poorer and less healthy; we often make bad decisions involving education, personal finance, health care, mortgages…” (May require purchase or user account) Link

 

 

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Bank Accounting Standards in Mexico: A Layman’s Guide to Changes 10 Years after the 1995 Bank Crisis Aldo Musacchio, April 2, 2008, Paper.  “After the 1995 crisis, the Mexican banking system experienced significant changes in bank accounting standards. Most of these changes took place between 1996 and 2001, and had a significant impact in the structure and interpretation of financial information of banks. This document explains the major changes on bank accounting, their purpose and structure, and discusses their impact on financial information reported by Mexican banks. It also provides the English equivalent of…” Link

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Smart Taxes: An Open Invitation to Join the Pigou Club. N. Gregory Mankiw, March 8, 2008, Paper. “Many economists favor higher taxes on energy-related products such as gasoline, while the general public is more skeptical. This essay discusses various aspects of this policy debate. It focuses, in particular, on the use of these taxes to correct for various externalities—an idea advocated long ago by British economist Arthur Pigou.” Link

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